Blog : Someone please explain…

Keith Adams

A Euro-look Polo, yesterday

A Euro-look Polo, yesterday

I’ve started seeing an increasing number of butchered 1994-2000 Typ 6N Volkswagen Polos on my commute into work. Not a bad little car, quite honest, but possibly a little on the flaky side, as per the Golf Mk3. In other words, worthy but dull. The way in which these cars have been butchered is quite evident from the picture above – cotton-reel like wheels, plenty of camber, stretched tyres and low, low, l-o-w suspension. It’s the Euro-Look, and right now is proving incredibly popular.

Obviously, I’m a bit of an old square because when I see these things trundling around, bouncing uncontrollably on our badly maintained roads, I see something of a safety issue going on. They hop, they, skip, and end up being near-as-dammit undriveable on average crumbling British roads. Fashion, eh…

But it has got me thinking – yes, these cars look like a dynamic joke, but are they any worse than the horrors that fashion foisted upon us over the years? Max Powered Citroen Saxos and Honda Civic Type-Rs of the 1990s; all-white KAT-kitted Escort XR3s and Rover SD1s of the ’80s; and jacked-up Ford Escorts and Morris Marinas of the ’70s. We’ve all been guilty of butchering cars for the sake of looking ‘cool’.

But what do you think of these Euro-Look cars? Should they be allowed to run on the road given their obvious dynamic failings and illegal wheel/tyre combinations?

Over to you…

Posted in: AROnline Blogs
Keith Adams

About the Author:

Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007. Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Clsssics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent... Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.

50 Comments on "Blog : Someone please explain…"

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  1. Stewart says:

    They do this to Mk2 golfs as well… my view in this is best ilustrated by the Mk2 I have, initially it had most of the ‘scene’ parts fitted (badly), thase were tacken of and sold, this paid for the car, and the missing parts to return to standard!

  2. Mark Pitchford says:

    I had a standard Marina 1800 in my youth. That was as near as dammit undriveable on any kind of roads (especially ones with corners) but they made thousands of Marinas!

    An exaggeration admittedly – but the point is, where do you stop? What about kit cars? What about the original Mercedes A class? What about 2CVs? Again many years ago, I had a friend with a 2CV and if 3 biggish youths swayed in coordination in the back seat, it became literally uncontrollable. (Irresponsible? Moi?)

    Alfas handle better than Protons. BMWs corner more impressively than Kias. But no-one suggests that Protons and Kias should be banned from the roads because they meet all of the regulatory demands required for them to go on sale.

    And that is true of these Euro-look cars too. They may seem an abomination to old timers like you and I, but if they meet the legal requirements demanded of them then why shouldn’t people be allowed to express their individuality?

    An alternative view maight lead us to introduce some sort of handling test into the MOT. But is more motoring bureaucracy really what we want? And would a standard 1800 Marina pass that test?

  3. David 3500 says:

    I do laugh at some of these butchered horrors our yoof seem to find cool.

    1990s Polos or Saxos, it doesn’t matter. Good-bye to standard stiletto height suspension and hello to a permanent snake belly ride height that twitches and pitches with every imperfection in the road’s surface. On goes a large bore exhaust that makes more noise but ultimately makes for a comical sight as the level of decibels it delivers does not translate into the same degree of forward moment.

    Then there is the ultimate horror as I saw last weekend in Exeter involving a beautifully polished Rover 45 – an unpainted alumimium Touring-car style wing on the bootlid that sat as high as the roofline. Just awful.

    Sorry, but most of the half-hearted efforts I see really make me wonder whether we have bred a nation that are aethestically blind.

    Let them carry on, is what I say, as I am in the safe knowledge that such horrors will never be purchased by me when the owners have gone deaf from the noise of that big bore exhaust and loud wireless, and their spines have been damaged by the dodgems ride comfort.

    PS – I am still in my ‘yoof-ful’ thirties and the only modification I ever did to my MG Maestro was to fit a red pinstripe along the sides and a chrome exhaust finisher; the latter to stop the fumes discolouring the underside of the bumper because the standard tailpipe was too short by an inch.

  4. The Euro look modifications are usually seen VWs. This is all a matter of taste. I kinda like them as they don’t look too overdone. With a neat, subtle and smoother bodykit, side skirts and spoilers.

    That’s when you compare them to the tacky spoliers and bodykits seen on Vauxhall Corsas and Citroen Saxos. The Euro-look modificaion is somewhat understated in comparison. If you’re talking only cosmetic modifications here. Only lowering them with the big wheels and loud paint jobs will draw attention.

    Lowering the car lowers its centre of gravity; as the bigger wheels should provide more grip and roadholding. Therefore, it should improve the handling characteristics. But the pay-off is a firmer ride and making them more vulnerable to speed bumps.

  5. It’s just fashion – and since when did fashion have to be sensible, or even look good in the eyes of the majority?

  6. daveh says:

    I think they look rather naff. Boy racers change their image all the time – a few years ago they were covered in pointless logos for wheel and stereo brands! Anyway aren’t those wheels illegal as they hang outside the arches?

  7. Stewart says:

    Indeed the wheels are illegal, as is fitting the wrong size tyre to get the ‘stretced look’

  8. Stewart says:

    Although ‘Rat look’ is an even bigger mystery!

  9. Andrew Elphick says:

    Hey, they’re fine by me, at least they are cherished with legal tyres, clean windows and an absence of ‘mum’s taxi’/’powered by fairydust’/’scatty bint on board’ yellow squares in the back window.

  10. Tony Cottrell says:

    …and Euro look fans probably don’t like MGBs. As far as I am concerned I always like to see people driving cars they care about whether to my taste or not- its the most expensive thing most of us buy, so let’s enjoy!

  11. Simon says:

    Isn’t the rat-look simply replicating the paint finish of most cars in the 70’s? (ie, rusty, with bits dropping off)?

  12. Stuart Roberts says:

    Of course, it’s all about the look rather than the abilty, which just shows the person in the car has no idea & is thus a warning to give said person a wide berth.

    That said, I have a 1990 Toyota MR2 here in Australia which has had some properly engineered changes done to it. One was the upgrade to 16 inch Rays wheels from Japan with magnesium centre sections. I’ve lost count of how many people think it would look great with 18-20 inch wheels. When I explain about how my car handles well & still has a compliant ride with lower unsprung weight, I get some odd looks.

    Alas, those that understand these things are in the minority. I wish I could have my old SD1 back & show them how a car on small wheels with balloon tyres would outrun their turbo charged buckets through some corners…

  13. jason18tc says:

    Cars will always be ‘done up’ I can remember souped up Anglias and Escorts from my youth, by the time I was driving it was Mk1 Fiesta’s.

    Just the way it is I’m afraid! One day they will be looking at MPV’s for their kids and being told off by beloved for driving too fast….

  14. bangernomics says:

    I’ve got an E36 328 on 15s, possibly the only one left in Britain on it’s original dinky alloys, unfortunately I’m not cool enough to have fitted it with undersized tyres. I also seem to have mislaid the imitation M3 bodykit and Lexus tail lights, a tragic oversight.

    Perhaps AROnline should expand it’s none left section to the last unmodified cars. Are there any original Saxo VTS left? Has anyone still got a 90s civic on steel wheels?

  15. Marty B says:

    It is the choice car of idiotic chavs. Cutting the springs with an angle grinder is common, and putting stupid wheels on. Then driving their 1 litre shopping carts as if they have stolen them. We are having a major issue with these lot having an illegal meet in the private car park near where I live once a month. The Police have already moved them on from several places.

    Sadly they think they look cool, but in reality, people are looking at tem and thinking ‘idiots’

  16. KC says:

    There’s another point worth mentioning about the people who drive these kind of cars. Around where I live they like to have the driver’s seat about 2mm from the floor.

    So the person driving looks like a midget peering over the steering wheel like a little old lady trying to drive her shopping trolley-Micra. Seems to be the fashion to have the top of your head level with the lower edge of the side window, which must be a bit dangerous for viewing the road

  17. Stewart says:

    @Andrew Elphick
    But ‘stretched’ tyres are NOT legal!

  18. david mckenzie says:

    As said above up to the owner if he or she want to spend all there money on there car its up to them my self have a early mk2 golf gti with slightly lower springs and pirelli alloys that came with the car when it was new 26yrs ago

  19. Jemma says:

    If theyre done well by someone who has some aesthetic talent then the results can look amazing and can improve performance too. Trouble is theyre mostly bluetacked on by muppets who couldnt spell talent, let alone aesthetic.
    I am also one of the people that cringes when she sees a exhaust pipe on the average Corsa that looks like it was nicked from a B17 in a breakers yard and the inevitable 1mm suspension travel.
    Yes, you can tune cars and lower them and the like, but have some understanding of what you are doing…
    1 inch spring chop gives you better fuel economy, 3 inches and that clang you just heard was your sump parting company with your soon to be seized Cleon…
    By all means fit a wide bore exhaust, but it will do sod all if you dont fit a low restrict cat or a cat bypass.
    Yay on the performance airfilter, but while you might enjoy your car caterwauling like a Napier Sabre on a cold morning, if you are still breathing through an intake system that looks and flows like an accordion that just lost a bout with an Argentinasaurus’s left boot, its not going to do the slightest bit of actual good.
    I have quite a few items on the Safrane that arent stock. all the T10 bulbs are now .75w LED, the sidelights are 9 array T10 leds which draw 1w to the old bulbs 5w and are brighter and whiter. Ive fitted, and will soon be replacing 30cm LED strips in a way that looks stock, and all H1 bulbs are filtered types for a whiter light. I can see better, and use less energy to do it.
    I’ve raised the tyre pressures to 40/37, fitted a pre heater, will be fitting a vacuum gauge. My MPG average is .8 increased over brand new without using the preheater & more than 1.3 with it even in the cold when it would drop to 19 – so in reality I’ll gain 3.3mpg which for a 17 gallon tank is almost 60 miles extra range, and thats without being gentle.
    I have no problem with people customising, my dream for the Safrane would be a sonoramic commando style tuned intake, or 4 motorcycle carbs, both of which offer more power and more economy. My issue is the people who plaster this stuff on amateurishly & have no sense of taste and most of all any concept that tuning and aftermarket parts are there to *improve* performance, looks & economy.
    As to the dangers of it, half of the cops dont know what theyre looking at, and if they do theres no actual law against turning some godawful VW chavwagen into the Dagenham equivalent of a Tatra 87 on black ice. Im personally ambivalent on the whole underlighting thing, the more lights the more visible… On the other hand the whole ‘my car looks like a Blastboat with b*ggered repulsorlifts’ thing… Not so good. Something like that comes up behind the average OAP and they might think its the stairway to heaven, not the Seat from Hell…
    All in all I think aftermarket stuff is often garbage for the gullible, and prefer the understated look. It’d cost about the same to forgo the body kit and fit up a proper free breathing exhaust, bigger plenum, different cam, decent intake, LED’s all round & good quality headlight bulbs, and you’d have a genuine improvement, with the not to be sneezed at advantage that 1. Speedbumps dont make you walk like Douglas Bader after a heavy night & 2. Traffic police dont grin like deranged maiden aunts when they see you coming.

  20. Jemma says:

    I might be wrong, but the ‘rat look’ may have been inspired by a certain P76-barge based Interceptor, of Mad Max fame. Cant say it did much for me, looked like a chevette on steriods, but there you go. I think the concept is that if your volvo 240 looks like it was a staff car in a Halo:Reach cutscene, then it must be cool!

    Incidentally, if you are ever down Colchester way look out for the 2CV van thats in full Afrika Corp desert dark yellow/panzergrau camoflage (with trailer), not to mention enough spades, tow ropes, jerry cans and the like all over it to be able to field service the 21st Panzer Division. There was also a traffic-light yellow Humber Hawk! And there are more than enough chavwagens of all shapes and sizes…

  21. Jemma: Thankfully the Mad Max Interceptor is totally unrelated to the P76. It’s a Ford XB Falcon.

    If you’re going to tie rat-look to films, I believe Richard Pryor did it quite well with a particular SAAB in “Moving”

    Though there are a lot of similar vehicles if you want to dig. That’s the one that always springs to mind when I think “rat-look”. Or indeed, what to do to make a stock SAAB 900 look interesting…

    This whole thing of modifying cars is… questionable. But as to the 6N Polos, I totally understand why.

    The VW “Scene” is probably one of the strongest. From the days of Cal-look Beetles (where I ‘grew up’), Santa Pod, Bug Jam and Resto-Cal, we got that movement being priced out – Type 2s are now five-figures, even for a ratted barn-door splitties (sorry, I mean rusty early vans), and Beetles are either rotten, the horrid McPherson-strutted ones, or expensive.

    So the Golf and Jetta got captured. In fact, when I was into that scene, I drove a Jetta Syncro and a Bug, both barely modified, and there were plenty of lowered Golfs and Jettas with G60, Jetta noses on Golfs, Golf noses on Jettas, tinted lights, as many accessories or as few appendages as possible. The stretched tyres seem relatively new, along with a resurgence of “banded steels”, both trends I utterly hate.

    Whilst the 6N is an ugly little spud of a car, it’s also current, not likely to be too hard to repair/broken beyond the limits of a trip to Halfords or a tyre retailer, and cheap. And it’s got a VW badge on it, thus giving entry to this scene. In desperation, the 6N tries to fit in with the now stylish Mk 2s – and in fairness to VW, the Beetle, the Mk 1 and 2 Golf, Jetta, Polo and Derby were all well proportioned, attractive cars to begin with. The 6N Polo is just ugly.

    Lupos are getting caught up in it too.

    What I really find infuriating though, is the sheer lack of imagination from this scene. When I introduced the NSU to the other website I frequent, amongst the first comments were claims that I should “hit it with the stick” – i.e. lower it. They can’t see the car as cool without it having been dropped, probably having the bumpers removed, etc.

    And if you think banger racers are killing off classics – man, you should SEE what the younger elements of this crowd are doing. Within days of securing a “one elderly owner OMG so mint it’s like new” retro ride, they’re rolling the arches, cutting the springs, slicing holes in the mint interior; condemning a future classic in pristine condition to a short lifespan of being butchered and rebutchered by a string of novice, scene-driven drivers until it’s beyond economic repair or real salvation.

    Some guys do sterling work. Taking proper old cars on the brink of scrapyard retirement, and slicing, dicing and modding to make fantastic period and contemporary customs. It’s a fine line between saving and modifying, and destroying a great survivor.

    However, since Keith’s mentioned the White KAT-kitted SD1s, and I just happen to have a white SD1 in the garage, I’m remembering early days of reading Street Machine, admiring the work of Andy Saunders and the stylish adverts for those distinctive KAT bodykits, and well, you never know what you can find on eBay…

  22. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    SD1 KAT-kit anyone?

    /K

  23. Steve Bailey says:

    I pass a old K reg Polo GT coupe in white on the way to work, the mark 2 version. It has steelies that look like standard ones but bigger and is lowered, but not stupidly so. To be honest, it looks okay, a bit like a tasteful Mark 2 Golf. There’s also a G reg Passat estate knocking about in silver with black windows and big wheels – makes a change from Golfs and the like, although the towbar spoils it!

    Not seen any tarted up Mark 3 Polos round here (Leeds), all the young ‘uns tend to have Corsas in either silver or black with black rear lights, silver stick on fuel cap covers and huge alloys (the Y reg – 55 version). It’s rare to see a 3 door Corsa with wheeltrims instead of alloys!

    I have proper respect for the young lad who works at the garage down the road and has a mark 2 Escort RS2000 in white that he rebuilt from a rotten shell. It looks so cool amongst all the modern stuff. It also looks tiny next to new Fiestas and the like!

  24. Steve Bailey says:

    The thing I remember best about the Kat kit was that all the cars they were fitted to looked exactly the same from the front with the same style of bumper used on them all!

    I only ever saw one in the flesh, fitted to an X reg Escort 1.1 in metallic blue. Matching the metallic blue was obviously beyond the capabilities of whoever fitted the bodykit, so they painted the bodykit satin block (no doubt from an aerosol!)

    Needless to say, it looked pants.

  25. Steve Bailey says:

    Satin black even!

  26. Jemma says:

    @ richard.

    I know a little about the VW scene, and yes, you are dead right with the one-careful-owner disasters that happen. One that actually made me almost cry was a story about an old man with a Humber Imperial. His boss had been the director of the water board and this man had been the chauffeur, driving said Imperial. When the man retired he was given this car as a retirement gift. It was mint, better than showroom, perfect from top to bottom and he kept it and drove it until he basically couldnt physically drive. So it was put up for sale. Some little idiot bought it, after twenty years of purring to the shops and back, got to the motorway and down went the foot, you can guess the rest… Engine was wrecked, bores scored, you name it, what the little pillock didnt manage to destroy he damaged.. Makes you want to wring their necks when people do that..
    You’re right on the interceptor, I was getting confused with the white Force 7 the shortlived GF drove in the first film. Myself I think I’d go with Blades ’68 charger with maybe a lightly blown 440/6 – to spice it up a little.

  27. David 3500 says:

    @ Keith Adams:

    That image you have just posted up of the Kat bodied Rover SD1 has the same effect as a 1950’s music teacher wearing a beige check woollen skirt and brown buckle shoes walking onto the set of a porn movie. It isn’t the done thing!

  28. Will M says:

    10 years ago, 6N Polos used to be the darling car of, shall we say, Public Schooled young ladies when I was at university. Whole rows of them outside the more exclusive student residences

    I guess ‘Daddy’ thought it would be reliable, safe, hold it’s value and still be respectable both on the country estate and about town.

    I guess that now the small car of choice might be a BMW Mini, 1 series or A1.

    Always preferred the Fabia over the Polo, especially in VRS form.

  29. Steve Bailey says:

    Have a look at what Kat did to this poor Mini! Talk about not taking into account the styling of the car when applying the “one design fits all” front bumper!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/38389354@N07/5254021814/in/photostream/

  30. Dennis says:

    “Lowering the car lowers its centre of gravity; as the bigger wheels should provide more grip and roadholding. Therefore, it should improve the handling characteristics. But the pay-off is a firmer ride and making them more vulnerable to speed bumps.”

    In theory yes, however there is more to it that just ‘lowering’ the car. Changing the vehicles ride height also as a rule changes other suspension geometry, camber, castor etc. A big problem is bump induced camber, it can make the car lurch when the suspension hits a bump, making control difficult. Fine for a race track, not so great on a bumpy road.
    Most of these things just get lowered and nothing else gets adjusted!
    Road cars are also legally required to have suspension travel, often this kind of thing just gets lowered so much that there is no longer any suspension travel.

    Of course though it all depends on who does the work and the standard it was done to. I once saw a clio where the welds on the strut tops had failed and the struts were now banging on the underside of the bonnet, simply because it had been lowered so far!
    Another one is the ‘smooth bootlid’ to do it properly means cutting out the number plate recess then panel beating an appropriately curved piece of metal then welding it in and lead loading it. I’ve seen quite a few where someone has just got a jumbo 10kg tub of easy sand filler and just packed the recess with the stuff! The crack that develops in the paint is a give-away!

    The rat look i think is basically just down someone who cant paint or buys an old heap and seeks to justify it as being ‘cool’

    It’s all much the same thing that’s always happened though, like those tiny 9″ steering wheels that were a must have accessory in minis at one point, even though they made parking impossible and made your shoulders ache! Just variations on the theme.

  31. BobM BobM says:

    Plenty of these Polo’s around where I live in fact I was having a nosey at a black example with huge steel wheels this afternoon, not my cuppa tbh. These cars all congregate in a large car park in town of an evening along with their Corsa/Fiesta/Saxo driving peers. Rarer vehicles among them, just as modified, include a Nissan Cube, white MG ZR with orange alloys and… Rover 45 lowered suspension with massive wheels, dustbin exhaust, spoiler and illegally tinted windows amongst other things. It still wears its Rover badges too. Class? Err no I think not.

    The real “menace” if you like is the fleets of mad kids on their mopeds/scooters/whatever you call them. As tarted up as the cars with lights and go (a little) faster bits etc but alas not a brain cell between the lot of them.

  32. Steve Bailey says:

    ‘Tis a small world.

    Had a look through the rest of the Flikr album (loads of 80s cars in Basingstoke) and AROnline gets a mention! “Fantastic article” nonetheless – well, they all are on AROnline!

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/38389354@N07/5174903588/in/photostream/

  33. Simon Hodgetts says:

    Last time I was in Wales I was tail-gated by a lad driving a Polo Caddy van, which had been lowered to the point of zero suspension travel, with wheels that looked like the front 4 from the old Tyrell 6-wheeler, stretched tyres and I guess modified wheel arches. The guy driving was keeping up with my Alfa 156 no problem, but I’ll bet he’d shaken all his teeth out by the time he’d reached Cardiff! Can someone also please explain the appeal of driving around in a van? I like vans – I’ve driven plenty for work and whilst moving house etc – I always quite enjoy them. But as an everyday car to drive for pleasure, let alone to customise and turn into something to be admired? Hmmmm, I’m obviously getting old……

  34. Jonathan Carling jonathan carling says:

    Never understood the attraction of doing this to old Novas either (or raves, house music, baseball caps on backwards and so on)

  35. Retro cars Christian Skelton says:

    I prefer this new euro-look craze to the Max Power brigade of yesteryear. At least the cars generally look cared for and can be returned back to standard.

  36. Andrew Elphick says:

    More Kat Keith!

    Have you got the “April fool” 84/85 Autocar with the blue kat mini that was an alleged ARG proto?

    Richard I was an avid Street Machine buyer through the 80’s I guess you bought Colin Burnhams “Cal look Volkswagens” and “classic vws”? Hell I even have a 20+ year old German car company brochure and bug jam flyer kicking about!

  37. Dr Bobby Love says:

    … Gotta say.. Quite like the 6n Polo.. And even quite like the Euro scene.. Modded cars do seem to cause allot of internet rifts though…. I’m more of a fan of the OEM+ scene.. but that doesn’t take much to tip over into Euro..

    That Green one above?? I do kinda like it..

  38. Dr Bobby Love says:

    .. Actually, That green one has a stock 16v bumper.. and a simple de badged grill… I’m pretty sure that’s a stock colour as well… and come on lads.. Ronal Turbo’s are a classic wheel, timeless…

  39. Maffc says:

    Never went for the whole styling mod thing. All smooth and no door handles? no thanks. As for the fart can exhausts, they just make me laugh.
    Personally I like my cars to look stock but be special where it counts in the engineering dept.

  40. Dennis says:

    “Can someone also please explain the appeal of driving around in a van? I like vans – I’ve driven plenty for work and whilst moving house etc – I always quite enjoy them. But as an everyday car to drive for pleasure, let alone to customise and turn into something to be admired? Hmmmm, I’m obviously getting old……”

    Often they’re cheaper to buy than a similar aged version of the car they’re based on. VW Caddy is basically a Golf/Polo underneath? So you can get similar performance for a lot less money. I’ve had a couple of Vauxhall Combo hire vans and even in standard form they drive very much like a sports car. And obviously as most are driven by young men, the ability to put a mattress in the back is probably a useful addition… or lots of speakers, which are obviously far more important than a leg over.

    Think about it though, modding vans is nothing new, probably started off with the Mini Van, vans were cheaper to buy than a car and you could drop the Cooper engine and brakes straight into one.

  41. Will M says:

    When I was helping my dad van shop a few years ago, I was surprised to find that vans are actually more expensive than similar year/spec cars!

    I’ve seen examples of the VW Caddy / Seat Inca vans modified. (debadge the Seat and it is the same as the VW).
    But when I was growing up there were people modifying Bedford CFs, mk2 Escort vans etc.

    It is a subjective matter of how far a modification should go and what is considered standard, when I had the ZX the little gits in the street of the previous owner had picked off some of the badging. I picked off the rest to debadge and T-Cut the outlines away. My local Citroen enthusiast was annoyed at this, as it was not standard!
    He also got upset because I switched numberplates on an imported GB Xantia to NI plates, as they weren’t the original numberplates!

  42. Tim Pearson says:

    Not really my thing, but if it gets yoofs interested in cars, why not? Even a badly modded one can’t drive any worse than the tired Dagenahm Dustbins carrying their kerbweight in extra lights that the same age group thrashed around 30-40 years ago, until the lack of relays set the dash ablaze.

    The VW Bora seems to be a favourite ‘scene’ car around here, in stark contrast to its dull image when new.

  43. Dennis says:

    “When I was helping my dad van shop a few years ago, I was surprised to find that vans are actually more expensive than similar year/spec cars!”

    However you often find vans with much higher mileage, so you can get a van at a lower price but a much higher mileage than the equivalent car. 5 year old small vans say a Combo with 250k on the clock don’t sell for much, you’d be unlikely to find a 5 year old Corsa with that many miles.

  44. “Can someone also please explain the appeal of driving around in a van?”

    Well, if you and your girlfriend still live with your respective parents you can always stick a mattress in the back :p

  45. Simon Hodgetts says:

    “Well, if you and your girlfriend still live with your respective parents you can always stick a mattress in the back :p” – ahh, that’s why the Maxi’s ‘bed’ failed – windows……

  46. Connor says:

    ‘Euro’ looking cars like this green polo are indeed pleasing to see. Unlike Saxos (the ultimate chav car) Corsas (the ultimate girl car, although the new VXR Corsa is pretty cool) ‘Euro’ looking cars are best suited to VW’s, Audi’s, BMW’s, Seats’s and dare I say Skodas? Basically the main german cars look best lowered to speedbump unfriendly, with 17″-19″ alloys with stretched tyres, and either with colour coded STANDARD bumpers(standard to that car make i.e. having a Golf MK4 1.9TDI and fitting R32 bumpers on) or ‘Stickerbombed’ pannels, without bodykits (because even the word bodykit makes me think of images of a saxo that looks like it’s just driven through halfords by someone who spent all their youth playing Need For Speed) Basically what i’m trying to educate some of you is that ‘Euro’ is NOT ‘Chav’ Euro is a varied style applied to a ‘VAG’s’ or ‘V-DUBS’ by enthusiasts who take care with their pride and joy unlike chavs who are at the complete other end of the spectrum. Chavs cant afford decent, expensive, smart wheels so they buy (or steal) cheap alternatives COUGH.HALFORDS.COUGH. Same goes for lights by duck taping ‘Lexus look-alikes’

  47. krs says:

    Tyres too narrow for the rims aren’t just aftermarket. My X-type Sport Premium has 225’s on 8’s – the sidewalls are pretty much vertical, and it’s far too easy to kerb the rims when parking.

  48. krs says:

    Oops. The rims are 7.5’s – but they still stick out too far!

  49. Will M says:

    Round these parts, the chosen boy racer wagons now are Boras and 306 diesels.

  50. James Godwin James Godwin says:

    They do it to the vans too. This one is growing on me….

    http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c332/andy_cull/DSC00946.jpg

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