MG was the best of Leyland…

Keith Adams

BL Quality chart index

BL Quality Index Chart

Well certainly according to AROnline reader Emma J Nation, who spotted this on a Midget/Sprite forum. It does pose more questions than it answers – where was the picture taken and when? It could be anywhere but my money would be on Abingdon.

If you know for sure, please get in touch the usual way…

Posted in: AROnline Blogs
Keith Adams

About the Author:

Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007. Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Clsssics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent... Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.

5 Comments on "MG was the best of Leyland…"

Trackback | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Andrew McCheyne says:

    Brilliant, the best thing I’ve seen for ages. My brother had a new Midget and I thought it very well made. However, what is Seneffe and what is a CU306?

  2. Andrew Elphick says:

    Seneffe was the Belgian BL factory, I believe; I’m quite immpressed the Princess was only just below the SD1 and the Jaguar!

  3. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    CV306 is the codename for the Sherpa 🙂

  4. Jonathan Carling Jonathan Carling says:

    Dating it would be interesting. Presumably some time beteen the SD1 launch in 1976 and the Ital in 1980. Early 3500s were of awful quality, so I’d guess 1979!

  5. Plews says:

    Is that what they were acheiving or what they were aiming for?

    Interesting to see the Land Rover at the bottom. From experience our farm had a late 1970s Series 3 Land Rover, having had one of each model since the early 50s.

    They were always like your expect series land rovers – tough as old boots.

    The Series 3 diesel however was shoddy – it never ran properly and spent a considerable amount of time being repaired. To quite my Uncle “It couldnt pull the skin off a rice pudding” and to quote my Granda “The bloody thing was made from the bits they swept up from the factory floor”.

    It very nearly broke our association with Land Rover – as many did we considered a Japanese alternative. But they actually brought a brand new 2.5 turbo 90 out to the farm in the late 80s and it impressed so Land Rover were given another chance. That was the best Land Rover we’ve ever had – it did 12 years of abuse without any trouble before it was exported to start a new life abroad. It was even more reliable than the 2000 Td5 we have at present!

Have your say...