Concepts and prototypes : Maestro development

LC10 was a conventional family hatchback in every sense of the word, and followed industry standard thinking in terms of mechanical layout.

However, because of internal politics, lack of resources and the fact that the Metro had to come first, the Maestro seven years to get into production.


LC10 in development

The clay modellers busy at work on the Maestro design at the "Elephant House" in Longbridge. (Photo supplied by Alexander Boucke)

The clay modellers busy at work on the Maestro design at the "Elephant House" in Longbridge. (Photo supplied by Alexander Boucke)

The finished clay model - interesting details to be noted here, such as bumper overriders and the use of the "Maxi" name on the radiator grille. (Photo supplied by Richard Bremner)

The finished clay model - interesting details to be noted here, such as bumper overriders and the use of the "Maxi" name on the radiator grille. (Photo supplied by Richard Bremner)


1981/82, and pre-production models are busy undergoing road and track testing. The front end treatment of these pre-production models was evaluated for the entry level Maestro, but was sensibly dropped at the last minute. The rather mean headlamps would, however, re-appear on the Maestro van in 1986. Note how different (some would say better) the Maestro looks without the side scallops, as depicted on the silver pre-production model (above). (Photo supplied by Alexander Boucke)

1981/82, and pre-production models are busy undergoing road and track testing. The front end treatment of these pre-production models was evaluated for the entry level Maestro, but was sensibly dropped at the last minute. The rather mean headlamps would, however, re-appear on the Maestro van in 1986. Note how different (some would say better) the Maestro looks without the side scallops, as depicted on the silver pre-production model (above). (Photo supplied by Alexander Boucke)


Crash testing at MIRA in 1977 - the Maestro performed well in the mandatory 30mph impact test.

Crash testing at MIRA in 1977 - the Maestro performed well in the mandatory 30mph impact test.


Maestro undergoing windtunnel testing - also at MIRA. Final co-efficient of drag was 0.36 - not brilliant, but ahead of the Ford Escort, and much of this performance was down to clever detailing such as a flush windscreen and integrated bumpers.Maestro undergoing windtunnel testing - also at MIRA. Final co-efficient of drag was 0.36 - not brilliant, but ahead of the Ford Escort, and much of this performance was down to clever detailing such as a flush windscreen and integrated bumpers.

Maestro undergoing windtunnel testing - also at MIRA. Final co-efficient of drag was 0.36 - not brilliant, but ahead of the Ford Escort, and much of this performance was down to clever detailing such as a flush windscreen and integrated bumpers.

Keith Adams

About the Author:

Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and watched it steadily grow into AROnline. Is the Editor of Classic Car Weekly, and has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, Classic Car Weekly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, and the the Motoring Independent... Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.

2 Comments on "Concepts and prototypes : Maestro development"

Trackback | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Reginald P. says:

    Second picture from above: I don’t think they’re bumper overriders; they must be headlamp washer-nozzles… 😉

  2. Paul says:

    Top photo – Theres still time to get another lump of clay and fill in those scallops. I see the guys got a beard though – explains everything.

Have your say...