BMC 1100/1300 : Italian variations

The first 1100-based Innocenti – the IM3 – was so-named as it was the third Innocenti-Morris joint venture, following the A40 and 950 Spider. It was launched as a Morris in the spring of 1963, and was joined the following year by a more basic, Austin-badged model. Production of the Morris models ended in 1970, while the Austin continued until 1974. The 1275cc engine never made it into any of the Innocenti-built ADO16, though it was used in the Innocenti Mini Cooper 1300 and the later ‘new’ Mini 120.


Morris models

Innocenti Morris IM3. (Picture: Gaetano Zagra)

Innocenti Morris IM3. (Picture: Gaetano Zagra)

The Morris IM3/IM3S series was produced from 1963-1970. Launched in the Spring of 1963, the original IM3 featured modifications to the headlamps fascia and interior. It had the twin-carb MG 1100 engine, and interestingly, a more upright steering wheel, made possible by the insertion of a universal joint in the steering column. Thus, the column disappears under the dashboard, instead of going straight down to the pedals as in the UK cars. The Morris IM3S (as pictured at the top of this page) was a mid-term revision of the IM3.

Innocenti Morris IM3S interior

Innocenti Morris IM3S interior

Innocenti Morris IM3S fascia

Innocenti Morris IM3S fascia


Austin models

 Innocenti Austin I4. (Picture: Gaetano Zagra)

Innocenti Austin I4. (Picture: Gaetano Zagra)

The Austin I4/I4S/I5 series was produced from 1964 to 1973. The Austin I4 was essentially an Austin 1100, built under licence with the standard single-carb engine and without the significant restyling applied to the IM3. The Austin I4S was a downmarket version of the Morris IM3S. The Austin I5, which replaced the I4 in the late ’60s, was a minor facelift of the I4 featuring a redesigned fascia plus a wider grille similar to the Austin 1100 MkII, but retaining the MkI car’s rear wings. In 1974, the I5 gave way to the locally-built version of the Allegro (called the Innocenti Regent), thus marking the end of the Innocenti ADO16 line.

NB: Some sources refer to the I4 and I5 models as ‘J4’ and ‘J5’, but they are the same thing. The confusion is thought to have arisen from the fact that the car’s badge featured the stylised ‘I’ from Innocenti’s logo, which in isolation could easily be mistaken for a ‘J’.

Innocenti Austin I5

Innocenti Austin I5

 Innocenti Austin I4 fascia and rear styling detail

Innocenti Austin I4 fascia and rear styling detail

Innocenti Austin I5

Innocenti Austin I5


This page was contributed by Declan Berridge, additional pictures supplied by Gaetano Zagra.


Keith Adams

About the Author:

Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007. Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Clsssics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent... Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.

5 Comments on "BMC 1100/1300 : Italian variations"

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  1. tonyandale says:

    Great picture’s , i am going to Italy on holiday in 2 weeks ,wonder if i will see any old Innocenti’s !

  2. Mr_Bol says:

    I translated an article on these Innocentis from a french magazine, check it here:

    http://www.autoshite.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=10104&p=246865&hilit=euroshite#p246865

  3. Nice!

    Not to different from something I’ve done before on this site:
    http://www.aronline.co.uk/cotm200712f.htm

  4. John Ruffle says:

    WHY did BMC fail to use any of Innocenti’s styling cues on their domestic products? Mk II Minis and 1100/1300s were totally destroyed by BMC/British Leyland. Finally, the problem was solved by replacements – the Allegro was nothing short of industrial sabbatage. Was it the designed brought in from Ford that messed things up? I just don’t understand how any of the stuff from the late 60s through the 70s ever got signed off for production. Mini Clubman, Morris Marina.. the list goes on.

  5. antonio says:

    cerco urgentemente ricambi per sospensioni polmoni HIDROELASTIC per INNOCENTI IM3 – per AUSTIN ALLEGRO / REGENT… ant. e post. Grazie.

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