Car of the Month : July 2009

Jaguar has all-but confirmed that the X-Type won’t be replaced when it drops out of production in 2010, and a lack sales in the USA is probably the reason for this decision. But just because the Americans didn’t go for it, doesn’t mean it’s a bad car… and Ken Strachan, a man who’s been in the business a very long time, is very positive about his latest aquisition.

What do you think? Was JLR wrong to put this car out to pasture?

Words and pictures: Ken Strachan


Grace, pace and space..?


Back home…

The Jaguar X-Type has come in for a lot of stick as being a dressed-up Ford Mondeo. And what’s wrong with that? Jaguar started out in (four-wheeled) business by putting more stylish bodies onto the Austin 7 chassis. The Austin was then an advanced and capable little car, but not glamorous; today’s Mondeo is an excellent car let down only by bland styling and an all too common badge.

Having driven everything from a Bombardier Can-Am to a flatbed Iveco Cargo – including a number of XJ40 development vehicles – I know what I want from my vehicles. My X-Type was actually chosen as a business tool, the factory satnav being essential for travelling to see clients, while the Bluetooth connection means I can talk to them on the move.

But grace, space, and pace are also priorities; along with some understated British style.

First impressions: I love the styling and the colour. Even if you don’t like the looks, you must admit, you won’t mistake it for a BMW or a Peugeot. There’s a faint whiff of leather as you open the door, and a nice blend of colours and textures as you enter. The seat still fits like a glove after 95,000 miles.

The engine starts promptly, has enough power to endanger my licence. It also has enough torque to lope up quite steep hills. The gearshift could be mistaken for an RWD setup, which is high praise in my book. The steering wheel looks and feels fine, and the steering is perfectly weighted at all speeds. Excellent brakes, a very stable chassis. Seats and a steering column which adjust every which way. A nice big satnav screen – still learning how to programme it! Thoughtful interior design, with lots of cubby holes. A slightly stiff ride around town, but fine out of town. Powerful automatic air conditioning.

Could I criticize anything? Of course… Obtrusive stitching behind the steering wheel spokes. A centre cubby box lid slightly too high. No room for a left foot rest. The automatic headlights sometimes come on in main beam, which is a bit selfish when they are Xenons.

But these are nitpicks. It’s a great-looking car which provides a wonderful, sporting, yet effortless driving experience. I expect 50+ mpg, with all the speed I need. I think my smile will take some time to fade.

What do you think?

Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Clsssics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

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Keith Adams

About the Author:

Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007. Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Clsssics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent... Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.

3 Comments on "Car of the Month : July 2009"

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  1. Hilton Davis says:

    Despite what anyone says against the X Type in either saloon or estate form I still think it looks good and I’m pleased Jaguar did build them. I hope one day soon an X Type replacement will arrive…

  2. Miguel says:

    I love my X-Type, it is different it is classy it has charm.
    Here in Portugal you dont see a lot of them out there you see a lot of BMW, Audis and Mercedes, all the same. I rather prefer something more exquisite and very rellyable, after all it is a JAG and not everybody can say Jag-you-are.

  3. krs says:

    Update February 2013: my car now has 172,000 on the clock, and is still getting me from A to B reliably and quietly. Parts from motor factors are rather cheap: air filter and front brake pads both £13. I recently drove a loan car diesel estate with 348,000 on the clock – rattled a bit, but still going.

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