By 25 September 2011 10 Comments Read More →

The converters : Lynx Eventer

The handsome Lynx Eventer filled a gap in the market for a top-notch sporting estate, and examples could often be seen at the smarter sporting events.


Lynx-Eventer

As with the XJS Spyder, many observers felt that the Eventer offered a significant improvement to the lines of the XJS. There was no argument that it offered far greater versatility, for while the boot space was similar to that of the standard car with the rear seats in place, it increased to some 39cu ft when they were folded, with the large rear hatch affording excellent access.

Each Eventer was hand-built to order, and could be based either on a customer’s existing car or delivered as a brand new model. The overall build time was 14 weeks, and each car came with a complete photographic record of the conversion process.

Production totalled just 67 examples over a period of some 16 years, with the final Eventer being built in the summer of 2002, based on a limited-production 6-litre XJR-S. At the time, the company speculated that either the Jaguar XKR or Aston Martin DB7 Vantage could be next in line for the shooting brake treatment…

Specifications
Rear platform width: 1130mm / 3ft 8ins
Rear platform length (back seats up): 1181mm / 3ft 10ins
Rear platform length (back seats down): 1880mm / 6ft 2ins
Rear door height: 570mm / 22.5 ins
Total loadspace (seats up): 672 cu dm / 23.75 cu ft
Total loadspace (seats down): 1103 cu dm / 39 cu ft

Lynx_Eventer_1983_30

The Lynx Eventer Page 6

Keith Adams

About the Author:

Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and watched it steadily grow into AROnline. Is the Editor of Classic Car Weekly, and has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, Classic Car Weekly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, and the the Motoring Independent... Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasable adventures all across Europe.

10 Comments on "The converters : Lynx Eventer"

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  1. Sam Mace Frankie the 75 nut says:

    I’ve always liked these, but I’m yet to see one. How many survive? Anyone know? Who here remembers the Audi Steppenwolf concept, that came along about 20 years later? Its sort-a-kinda similar to this.

  2. Will M says:

    What was the bootlid from?

    The XJ estate used one from a Renault 5.

    Very elegant. Similar to the Reliant Scimitar.

    Can’t think of many contemporary shooting brakes. There was that BMW breadvan thing a few years back.
    Ferrari FF too.

    The whole 2 door estate variant has been abandoned, remember you could get Escort 2 door estates.

  3. Simon Woodward says:

    I really like these, Jaguar should have marketed this car. They could have easily had these coach built by Lynx or even a coach builder with spare capacity and the workforce to convert standard cars, like Tickford maybe. I have seen a few of these cars in the flesh over the years and they look stunning, as if it was always intended to be this way rather than a very clever conversion. The Avon XJ6 estate however is pants, a real mess.

  4. Sam Mace Frankie the 75 nut says:

    @ Will M.
    I’d forgotten about those Escorts. Kind of cool in an odd way…most have them have been butchered by modders over the years sadly.
    Modern shooting brakes? Does the Volvo C30 count :-)?

  5. Richard Kilpatrick Richard Kilpatrick says:

    I had a 2-door Mk 2 Astra estate in the mid ’90s. Was practical family transport, as it happens. Sometimes forget I even owned it.

  6. David Dawson says:

    It’s an attractive style, the two door sports estate/shooting brake. The Lynx Eventer is a great example.

    I’m sure it could be made popular again – look at the MINI Clubman. Larger cars could have something similar to its extra side door for improved practicality.

  7. Will M says:

    Fine line between a hatchback, coupe, shooting brake and estate.

    If the C30 is such, where does the Scirrocco or the Brera sit? The slow selling Hyundai Veloster?

  8. Terry says:

    Article says this car was produced from 1986 till 1982, I clearly remember seeing one regulary in about 1979/80 with the registration XJV 53 parked on the green as you enter Hartley Wintney on the A30. I assume this may have been a very early one off and the reg number is still seen locally but now on a VW Passat!

  9. Will M says:

    The above example was used by the boss of the American fast food chain International House of Pancakes, awaiting him off his private jet on his UK holidays.

    Or so it would seem….

  10. didierz65 Didier Ziane says:

    I’m pretty sure the bootlid was from a Citroen GS/A.

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