By 24 February 2011 122 Comments Read More →

China Watch : Chinese MG3 launch draws closer

Adam Sloman

The MG3’s launch is looming in China as the media get to grips with the follow up to the MG ZR.


The build up to the Chinese launch of the MG3 continues with the car coming under the scrutiny of the local motoring press.

Small MGs have always been popular, with the Metro and, more recently, the ZR proving that there’s a big market for a city-centric MG. These pictures, taken from the Chinese site Autohome.com.cn, give the best impression yet of what we can expect from the new supermini.

The MG3 will succeed the MG3SW, (the reborn Rover Streetwise) aiming squarely for the youth market, with a predicted Chinese-market price of around £6000. In size terms, the car’s 3990mm length puts it firmly in Ford Fiesta territory with 15in alloys on the higher-specification models (lower models will probably sport 14in steel wheels).

Power comes from SAIC’s New Small Engine, a 1.5-litre engine, developing from 90bhp. This makes the 3 the first Shanghai-era MG not to feature a K-Series-derived engine – with both manual and automatic transmissions on offer.  A more potent,  turbocharged variant is set to follow, as well as a new-crossover planned for later this year.

Inside, the futuristic MG ZERO Concept’s dash is gone, replaced by audio controls inspired by Apple’s iPod, with similar style controls repeated on the steering wheel. Quality seems to have improved from the somewhat questionable model shown at the Guangzhou Motor Show late last year. It’s solid, if unspectacular, and does without extras like the Roewe 350’s Android-powered in-car entertainment systems.

The small car B-segment is a rapidly growing one in the PRC, with an increasing number of under 30s now able to afford to buy their own car and SAIC Motor will be keen to maintain their success with the 3SW which, despite its aged underpinnings, has been something of a hit with buyers.

During last week’s UK Media Briefing, MG Motor UK’s Sales and Marketing Director, Guy Jones indicated that the MG3 is likely to be the next MG to make it to these shores, with an expected late-2012 launch.

With thanks to China Car Times

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122 Comments on "China Watch : Chinese MG3 launch draws closer"

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  1. Alex Scott says:

    I quite like the MG3 shown in the photographs above but it’s funny how I’m not so keen at all on the MG6 although the MG6 looks better in some colours than others.

    I think, perhaps, the front view of the MG6 needs a little more styling (a bit more grille perhaps) whereas the MG3 is okay because the nose/grille take more of the car so to speak. One of the side views above looks like the Allegro… Hmm, I like the MG3.

    Alex.

  2. Paulo says:

    The problem is that the interior looks as cheap as hell – a lot worse than the ZR. The MG3’s exterior looks quite neat, though.

  3. Simon Hodgetts says:

    No, it looks nothing like an All-aggro! HOWEVER, there is a nod to the TR7!

  4. Will F says:

    Well, if the MG3 turns out as cheap-looking as that in the UK, I won’t be giving up my rather good MY10 Ford Fiesta for one!

    I’m 25 and I’d certainly be in the market for a sprightly little MG supermini if it was as good as the new Fiesta. Sadly, this car looks like another bland rival for the Hyundai i20s and Kia Vengas of this world.

    It’s a shame that the UK market isn’t that important globally for MG.

  5. MaffC says:

    Externally, the MG3’s very nice and has crisp styling. Internally, it’s very disappointing. The dash looks extremely basic – like a late 1980s model. I hope the Euro-spec models get something of an upgrade in that department.

  6. Simon Woodward says:

    I like the MG3 and think that it complements the MG6. I hope that MG gets the pricing and package right with MG3 and MG6. They will have to get over the inevitable bitching from certain so-called motoring journalists and negative doom and gloom brigade.

    Screw them together properly, price them keenly, stick a big warranty on them and offer a good aftersales dealer service and MGs will soon be rolling of the production line at Longbridge providing valuable employment to the region.

  7. Alex Scott says:

    I quite like the interior – it doesn’t look too busy and has nice, clean lines. Maybe it is cheap – I don’t know but, if it’s solid and doesn’t rattle, for a small car I’d be happy with it. Anyone who has driven a Ford Fiesta will know they are cheap and rattly – the Fiesta’s interior reminds me of the Sierra’s interior so nothings changed then.

    Alex.

  8. Wilko says:

    Power comes from SAIC’s New Small Engine, a 1.5-litre engine, developing around 90bhp

    Oh so, less powerful than the smallest-engined ZR then. Exciting!

  9. Ryan says:

    I’m sorry but I’m not sold on this car at all – in fact, the more I see it the less I like it.

    The shape is “plain Jane” and very frumpy while its front end just looks so wrong – like a parody of a VW Polo. The inside is very dated although in its defence just from the pictures above, it does clearly look like a step up in quality from the pictures we saw last year, so who knows?

    However, strip the car of all its bells and whistles and it really is a very odd and frumpy car. I suspect that, unless the MG3’s the best car to drive in its class (and, as it will be two years old by the time it gets here, I can’t see that happening), then there is likely to be little to recommend it.

  10. Jonathan Carling Jonathan Carling says:

    It’s the TR7 feature line that really makes it stand out. It’s a distinctive, classy design – much better than the MG6.

  11. Ianto says:

    The MG3 is a brilliant car – any doubters should have a look first at the more detailed pictures on China Car Times.

    The dash is less sophisticated than the Roewe 350’s but there are lots of clever features and neat touches which set it apart from the more humdrum offerings of Ford and Vauxhall.

    This is the car that the UK needs now – it is a shame that they couldn’t launch this here at the same time as the MG6.

  12. Magnus says:

    It’s a nice enough car inside and out, in a bland sort of way. However, take a look at the close-up of the instrument binnacle: bubbling around the indicator arrows and ill-fitting trim around the edge. What a load of tat!

  13. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Magnus
    I saw that too. Hopefully, it’s just a symptom of things getting checked together too quickly to get cars out to view.

    I would think that the UK-spec cars will have been fettled a bit better when they are launched here…

  14. Doodle says:

    I wouldn’t like to make a judgment on any of the new MG models. Remember that, if it wasn’t for NAC/SAIC Motor, the MG marque might well have become extinct.

    My major concern is that the MG3 will not be launched here in the UK at the same time as the MG6. The comments about the need to get the quality right before a UK launch should really be a non-starter unless that’s because the quality levels in China are not up to European standards.

    The interest in MG is now probably at its highest since the closure of Rover six years ago so would it not be beneficial to launch both models simultaneously?

  15. Rooster says:

    I understand from some of MG Motor UK’s current employees that it’s not feasible to build the MG3 in Longbridge at this time. The 25/45 tracks have been dismantled while the MG6 is currently using the 75 tracks and, with less than thirty employees on the assembly line, it will be a long time before the MG3 is produced there.

    SAIC Motor needs to accelerate its plans to increase production at Longbridge before the general public and future customers go elsewhere. I’m afraid that launching new MG models in China twelve to eighteen months before they reach these shores will result in them being old news by the time that they do arrive here.

  16. Richard Moss says:

    @Doodle
    I am certain that, if NAC/SAIC Motor hadn’t bought the MG name, then someone else would have been able to pick it up for a few quid from the Administrator.

    @AROnline members
    This car has no connection with MGR and little connection with the UK (other than the application of a historic badge).

    Honestly, I just can’t see why you’re all getting to pant-wettingly excited – it is NOT (let me repeat that for the hard of understanding) NOT an MGR product/descendant/relic. MG and MGR (as we knew them) are dead – get over it, move on, buy an old Jaguar or BMW MINI because they will, at least, have been built in Britain by British workers in an ex-BL factory.

    There may have been some UK design input – but I think the same was true of Daewoos (or was it Hyundais? Doesn’t matter anyway) yet I don’t see this level of fuss being made over the Daweoo/Chevrolet Matiz.

  17. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    @Richard Moss
    Christ, Richard, I think you really underestimate the intelligence of AROnline’s readers with comments such as, ‘it is NOT (let me repeat that for the hard of understanding) NOT an MGR product/descendant/relic. MG and MGR (as we knew them)’

    Do you really think that people posting positive comments about this car aren’t aware of where it was built and designed?

    Sheesh!

  18. Keith B says:

    @Keith Adams
    Sorry Keith, I agree with Richard Moss – this is NOT an MG. The MINI is a continuation of the lineage as are the Jaguars and Land Rovers. This is a nameplate attached to a Chinese car. It may as well be an Alvis, Lanchester or Hillman in my opinion.

  19. Wilko says:

    @Keith Adams
    Well, although I wouldn’t make a judgment on the intelligence of anyone, I think Richard has a point. Some of the comments (and, in particular, the very defensive responses that tend to follow any negative remarks) do suggest there is a perception that Longbridge is about to be restored to its former glory. Sadly, evidence would suggest otherwise.

    Indeed, if the return of MG to the market just means sticking the octagon on some foreign tat, then what is there for those of us who really care about the firm’s history and legacy to get excited about?

  20. Dave Hargrove says:

    I’m not really sure that the transition from the ZERO Concept to the production model has been entirely successful – the side and rear views look quite Third World, the interior doesn’t look too bad, but all that plastic appears to be white and consequently cheap. The front end treatment isn’t too bad but the grille and badge could do with being a bit more prominent, otherwise not to bad an effort.

  21. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    @Keith B
    No, no, no… It’s not what Mr. Moss says that’s annoying and patronising, it’s the delivery. I doubt there’s anyone who reads this site (because we have a great and well-informed readership), that doesn’t understand exactly what this car’s heritage is.

    Mr. Moss’ rant was breathtakingly arrogant in its delivery. ‘Tis all I was saying. I think we all know that it’s a British-designed, Chinese-built and engineered car, wearing a heritage nameplate.

  22. Steven211 says:

    The MG3 does look disappointing compared to the ZERO, but I expected that. However, it would be nice if it has LEDs for DRLs like the ZERO and the bonnet features of the ZERO.

    The interior has a nice modern design, but it looks cheap and plasticky compared to the likes of the Vauxhall Corsa etc. but, as Autocar says in this week’s issue, the MG3 will require more ‘regionalisation’ then the MG6 so I guess that will be engines (direct injection), interior and maybe some exterior mods. Incidentally, just to correct you, the 1.5 engine has 107bhp.

  23. Bob says:

    I was cynical, but the more I look at it, the more I like it 🙂 – especially the clean and well laid out engine bay. This may be a clue to why they have a new engine too – is it because the K-Series wouldn’t fit? The K is canted forwards and this engine seems canted back to squeeze in the narrow opening… but that may be an optical illusion.

    Anyway, so long as MG offer higher spec’d interior furnishings as options, I’m happy with the insides.

    However, I do think they should look at the 1.4l K-Series engine as an option, both for greater power and capacity (and performance) increases. After all, if the new TCI cylinder head has fixed the gasket problems, why not?

    Oh, and I totally agree with Rooster, Doodle and Ianto – simultaneous global launches are the way to go nowadays as otherwise sneak peaks like AROnline gives us make the eventual launch in other markets a ho hum affair.

    However, SAIC Motor probably want to sort build quality in China, where the market is used to early product glitches getting sorted post-sale (which is how it works in New Zealand with mostly Chinese made goods).

    Good luck MG!

  24. Steven211 says:

    Bob :
    However, I do think they should look at the 1.4l K-Series engine as an option, both for greater power and capacity (and performance) increases. After all, if the new TCI cylinder head has fixed the gasket problems, why not?

    This new engine has 107bhp, not 90bhp though, so it is more powerful then the K-Series.

  25. Wilko says:

    The dash looks extremely basic – like a late 1980s model. I hope the Euro-spec models get something of an upgrade in that department.

    Looking at the picture, it doesn’t even appear to have a temperature gauge. I’ve driven quite a few cars over the years, including some very cheap and basic ones, but I don’t recall ever coming across a dashboard that doesn’t have one of those.

    There also seems (unless it is cleverly concealed) to be no needle for the fuel gauge! Perhaps, in a tribute to Longbridge’s heritage, they’ve engineered it to fall off…

  26. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    @Wilko
    The fuel gauge is combined with the speedo on the right hand side. Loads of new cars do without a coolant temp gauge these days, something I disagree with.

    /K

  27. Richard Moss says:

    Keith Adams :
    @Keith B
    I think we all know that it’s a British-designed, Chinese-built and engineered car, wearing a heritage nameplate.

    Well, in that case, why is it getting so much “airtime” here? – We all know that it’s not an MGR/Rover/ARG/BL/BLMC/BMC car and never will be. We may as well be talking about a Spanish-built Ford Fiesta or Vauxhall Corsa for all the relevance that this thing has (I think that the Corsa is built in Spain – it’s a long time since I took any notice of them!).

    My “rant” was aimed at those readers who seem to think that the MG3 somehow heralds the re-birth of MG. It doesn’t and it will create very few (if any) British jobs. The MG6 will create a handful of assembly jobs (but, crucially, little or nothing in the supply chain where traditionally there are five jobs for every one on the production line) but the 3 will do nothing for the UK economy other than, perhaps, take away a few sales from cars that are actually built here. Shall we devote endless space to Geely Gleagle, the Maple Marindo or the Chery A1 too?

    I, too, wish that we could turn the clock back to 1989 when Rover was in reasonable health financially, employed thousands of British workers, was British-owned and made a significant contribution to the British economy. I wish for that but it isn’t ever going to happen.

    I know some people don’t like me saying this kind of stuff but perhaps someone needs to cast a critical and realistic eye over what is on offer from SAIC Motor. I hope, in all honesty, that they don’t manage to sell a single MG3 in the whole of Europe – I would rather people spent their money on cars at least built in the EU.

  28. Darren, Lancs says:

    I quite like it but, more importantly, young people (at whom the car seems to be aimed at) will very much like it.

    I think the MG3 will be snapped up by eager buyers if it’s priced correctly – if it’s on sale for around £6000 in China, what, I wonder will the UK price be?

  29. Wilko says:

    Keith Adams :
    @Wilko

    The fuel gauge is combined with the speedo on the right hand side. Loads of new cars do without a coolant temp gauge these days, something I disagree with.

    /K

    Thanks – I didn’t realise that. Perhaps it’s a subtle “our cars are so reliable that you don’t need one” message!

    I agree though, it’s a bad thing to do without for the tiny cost saving it must represent.

  30. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    Richard Moss :

    Keith Adams :
    @Keith B
    I think we all know that it’s a British-designed, Chinese-built and engineered car, wearing a heritage nameplate.

    Well, in that case, why is it getting so much “airtime” here? We all know that it’s not an MGR/Rover/ARG/BL/BLMC/BMC car and never will be. Blah, blah, blah…

    Easy questions to answer and thank you for raising them:

    1) It’s my site, it has MG on the front door (among others), and people are interested in this stuff. You don’t like it, fine – but stop insulting the readers, assuming they’re all wallowing in ignorance and living in the past.

    2) The MG3 may or may not be built in the UK. You don’t know, I don’t know. However it was sure as hell designed here. There are a lot of British Designers and Engineers working on it and, currently, SAIC Motor is investing in the UK (in a way) – I support any inward investment in the UK.

    Anyway, thank you for your critical and realistic view of the situation. I get it, and I appreciate and respect your opinion. Now how about respecting the opinion of others?

    Ultimately, AROnline covers a portfolio of marques and MG is one of those. We’re reporting the news as it stands now and not editorialising it here – it’s the situation UK PLC finds itself in right now, and I’m giving it coverage…

  31. Richard Moss says:

    OK – I’m not here for a fight and I’ve said my piece. I note that a number of other readers agree with me.

    One final thought, though: SAIC Motor’s inward investment in Britain looks pretty insignificant to me – a handful of jobs on the assembly line at Longbridge, a few design jobs and that’s about it. It’s hardly something to be excited by (in my opinion, of course).

  32. DaveyC says:

    This would sell well in the UK – please build it in the UK asap.

  33. Russ says:

    I’m not that sure about this one – I think I need to see it in the metal before I make up my mind. I really don’t think it is as attractive as the ZR but it has to be different for it to have even a chance so let’s see how it all comes together and how well it gets put together.

    I have every confidence in the Chinese being able to produce a good overall product. VW produce many cars in China and the build quality does seem fine even if a premium company holds its reputation on the finished product.

    I reckon that, if MG can get its product to the market at the right price and iron out any niggles it will undoubtedly have, I’m sure they can get a saleable product.

    Let’s face it MGR had many issues which it ignored and kept on churning out cars with the same old issues that I excepted and still do put up with (my door handle still flies off of its own volition). To be honest, I am waiting to see how they fair and what comes to the market before I shell out and renew my trusty ZR…

  34. Steven211 says:

    Well, you can’t expect a small company like MG to employ thousands like Vauxhall do at Ellesmere Port. One reason is that MG Birmingham is one of the smallest car plants in the UK now and they can’t just invest millions and then find that the car sells badly as that would be financial suicide.

    They have to build up their staff slowly when they need them. Morgan do a similar thing – they only employ people when they need to ramp up production etc. SAIC Motor employ around 300+ Designers and Engineers – that is a lot and in one the UK’s industrial sectors which most needs such jobs.

  35. Russ says:

    @Richard Moss
    I agree totally – I have not been to the plant now for two years. I repair forklift trucks and used to look after the whole of Powertrain (East Works) which had eighty-five units but, on my last visit, it felt very strange in the CAB building – I had the feeling that it was either about to close or gear up for a massive investment andrestart.

    I really do want SAIC Motor to increase capacity but the amount of the plant which has now gone and the tiny workforce that remains is unbelievable.

    I hope it’s a case of watch this space but I’m not so sure – again, that’s only my opinion…

  36. James C says:

    It’s cheap but cheerful.

  37. Ross A says:

    The MG3’s a smart looking car and, as long as they get the colour-coding for the interior right, it should sell like hot cakes over here…

  38. Benny Ben Adams says:

    That looks good – ok, a few things need addressing re dash quality but it’s a dynamic and exciting prospect. £6000 is the price it WON’T be here because, sadly, we are being milked for every last penny we have.

    It was brought to my attention earlier this week that you can buy an MG6 in Belarus for around £12k – that’s £4-5k less than the RRP we have. Keith Harris of MG Motor is very clever with his wording as he states ‘No EU launches before UK Launch’, Belarus is not technically in the EU but is considered to be in the continent of Europe so, whilst he is technically correct in his statement, he is not telling the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

    These cars cost SAIC Motor buttons to make – even to a good standard of finish. We are not being allowed to manufacture much of the final car, so UK production costs are not that high at all. MG Motor should therefore price the car more realistically and not try to take more money off us – they already got the company for a song!

    I feel the starting price for the MG6 Fastback should be £13k and £15k for the Saloon, a 5 year warranty should be standard with an option on the customer to buy years 6 and 7 for a nominal amount as per MINI’s arrangements.

    Finally, could the naysayers please stop repeating the idea that the new MGs are not true MGs – at the end of the day, MGs were always sporty versions of the parent company’s car. This time it’s SAIC Motor’s turn and they have made an MG out of the rather bland (IMO) Roewe 550.

  39. Ianto says:

    @Wilko
    There is no temperature gauge on a Kia Picanto, merely a light that stays on until engine warm and then lights up in a different colour if the engine’s running hot.

    Works well enough, though.

  40. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    Keith Adams :
    @Keith B

    No, no, no… It’s not what Mr. Moss says that’s annoying and patronising, it’s the delivery. I doubt there’s anyone who reads this site (because we have a great and well-informed readership), that doesn’t understand exactly what this car’s heritage is.

    Mr. Moss’ rant was breathtakingly arrogant in its delivery. ‘Tis all I was saying. I think we all know that it’s a British-designed, Chinese-built and engineered car, wearing a heritage nameplate.

    Well, I’m glad it wasn’t just me who thought this self-styled spokesman of the masses was arrogant and patronising.

    Well said, Keith.

    @Steven211
    Exactly, I think it is easy to forget the scale of operation at Abingdon before it shut. MG was a small brand within MGR at Longbridge and was never historically a huge volume car builder.

    @Richard Moss
    @Keith B
    Look, if a car is built in a factory (Chinese or British) by a company which owns the name and puts the badge on it, then it’s an MG. Austins were still Austins when built in UK, Spain, Australia, Belgium etc. Stop nitpicking and get a life.

    Richard, you say you’re not here for a fight but, to be honest, that’s all you seem to try and do in every thread which you grace with your esteemed presence.

  41. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Wilko
    @Ianto
    My wife’s Peugeot 106 didn’t have one either

  42. Paul says:

    @Richard Moss
    I think we are missing the point here. The fact is Britain messed up badly and threw away MGR to the Chinese.

    You can say what you like about the car, SAIC Motor or to what extent Britain has had a hand in the design and development but the fact is that MG is being given a fresh chance – if this car and the others have sufficient appeal the name will live on into the future.

    Hardly any modern car has a real lineage with its predecessors. To what extent is a BMW M3 related to a 1950s BMW bubble car? The fact that the MG3 has nothing in common with an MGB or MG Metro is therefore of no consequence.

  43. Hilton Davis says:

    Whoa… a very vociferous comments column here! Anyway, although I’m not a 100% fan of the MG3, these pictures look nicer than the earlier ones we saw.

    It still looks like a Hyundai i10 or i20 to a degree but, hey, many cars look like that these days. We have to realise that the heritage image of MG will not last forever. At least the facelifted badge is still octagon shaped… I probably wouldn’t buy one but wish it well!

  44. Simon Woodward says:

    @Paul T
    All your points are well put.

    AROnline would be a pretty boring site if everyone agreed with each other but some of the aggressive and negative remarks on the new MG6/MG3 and the MINI are just making it a uncomfortable place to blog if you happen to like either of these cars.

    I felt sorry for Keith today – he has spent thousands of hours researching and putting together this excellent site. I know of no other car site which is as comprehensive and accurate and, for those who don’t know, this is not Keith’s full time job but a instead a passionate hobby and a life’s work.

    The latest content of News and Blogs about new MINIs or MGs is a welcome addition and seeing to readers’ points of view is interesting. However, much as I want to shout at some of the pointless comparisons or the ageist or xenophobic anti-Chinese/German remarks, I prefer instead to except a person’s point of view. This is because I prefer to confront a person face to face and use my full name, rather than cowering behind a keyboard serving up cheap insults.

    A lesser man than Kieth would have been tempted to pull the plug today but, then again, he’s probably carrying a big pair than some!

  45. Jonathan Carling Jonathan Carling says:

    @Simon Woodward
    Well said, Simon. I support every word of that. Keep it up, Keith!

  46. Darren, Lancs says:

    @Simon Woodward
    Well said, I couldn’t agree more. It’s easy to forget that Keith and the team put a huge amount of effort into AROnline.

    This is a great website – there are some excellent articles on here and it’s always very interesting and informative.

  47. Wilko says:

    @Simon Woodward
    @Paul T

    I have to laugh when, on the one hand, we get words to the effect of “why can’t we all just be nice and get along?” and then, in the next breath, any criticism of SAIC/MG is dismissed as “xenophobic”, “cheap insults”, “arrogant”, “patronising”, etc, etc. Presumably that’s on the basis that it doesn’t happen to be in tune with your own views?

    Surely, the whole point of enabling comments on these articles is to generate debate – if that offends you then there is no obligation to participate! Furthermore, to suggest that people’s criticism of the conduct of SAIC/MG is in some way a slight on Keith as Editor of this site is ridiculous. We all appreciate what a great resource AROnline is, otherwise we wouldn’t be here.

  48. Ianto says:

    @Simon Woodward
    @Jonathan Carling
    Excellent points, well made.

    The vitriol directed at anyone supporting the new MINI is particularly tiresome as are the anti-BMW comments that certain posters revel in. BMW continue to invest in the MINI and continue to build in the UK, yet certain posters keep harking back to the pre-Phoenix days and laying all blame with BMW. I am surprised that they are not bringing the Second World War into their arguments, such is the nature of their xenophobia.

    Perspectives need to be adjusted, and I would direct all critics of this British-built car to the excellent book by Simon Garfield.

    Maximum respect to Keith for continuing with this website!

  49. Antony Blackwell says:

    Well, this is the first time I have commented on AROnline but I can see that this article has opened a right old can of worms! It does amaze me how fickle we can be.

    @Richard Moss
    I can understand your views but, as Keith said, we are not all numptys here on AROnline! We forget so much about MGR’s fragmented past and not to mention MG’s future!

    Remember MGs have always been mainstream production cars which had the MG badge added to them. Rovers cars were either developed with the help of Honda (rebodied Legends/Concertos/Civics) or BMW and then we had the demise with the ‘Phoenix Four’ and we all know what happened there!

    You can have your rant at SAIC Motor but, consider this: if MGR was still alive, would you buy there cars if they were built in collaboration of Proton, China Brilliance etc? I think I can answer that for you!

    We have to remember that China is a major player in the global market these days but they are still a secretive society and it does grate with us all on here that they let us know very little information about our beloved MG. We can’t look back at AR/Rover/MGR and think that these great days will be back….THEY WONT! However, if SAIC Motor get the ingredients right, then there is room at Longbridge to introduce new lines, machinery, etc.

    They are building a good design team there and, hopefully in the future, Longbridge will play its part in the global world of MG. We may not like some of the products they will launch but, like everything, we have to move on so MG3 does look like it will sell well as long as the package is right (price/trim/quality/aftersales, etc).

    I, for one, hope they do get it right because if people on here start to moan and groan then we are as bad as the motoring press and MG will end up as a brand disgraced just like Rover!

    Keep up your good work Keith. I thank you for all the great effort you put into this site to keep this sycophant happy.

  50. Ianto says:

    Ben Adams :
    Finally, could the naysayers please stop repeating the idea that the new MGs are not true MGs – at the end of the day, MGs were always sporty versions of the parent company’s car. This time it’s SAIC Motor’s turn and they have made an MG out of the rather bland (IMO) Roewe 550.

    I agree completely, the MG3 is a real MG.

    After all, what parts of the original Morris DNA did the MGF have?

  51. Richard Moss says:

    I had said that I’d “said my piece” but I want to explain where I stand on this. I accept that other people don’t agree with me and that’s fine, it’s their choice.

    @Paul
    The BMW M3 is made by the same company that made the bubble car – BMW. It will have no components in common with that bubble car but ultimately has evolved from it.

    @Paul T
    The same applies to foreign built Austins. They were built by a part of BMC (or whatever it was called that year) and have a direct bloodline to the Austins built here. However, if Austin were building Ford Escorts in Greece, sticking an Austin badge on the front would not make it an Austin.

    There are Ford Cargo(?) trucks built under licence overseas and wearing Leyland badges – a picture was posted on MacDroitwich a while back showing one. Is that a Leyland truck or is it a Ford? I would argue that it’s not a Leyland therefore it must be a Ford.

    @Ianto
    The MGF is connected to Morris through the fact that it was made by the same company that made Morris. Nuffield ultimately morphed into Rover/MGR who gave us the F and TF. Again it’s bloodline. I don’t look like my grandfather but an descended from him – changing my name would not make otherwise (nor would calling myself Windsor make me a member of the Royal family!).

    The process was one of evolution in all of the above cases – in the case of the MGF the parent company changed names along the way but it was still the same company.

    @Ben Adams
    Well, as one of your “naysayers,” I will continue to say that the MG3 is not a proper MG – in my opinion. Up to now, all MGs have been derived from Morris/BMC/BL/ARG/ROVER/MGR and as such come from an unbroken family tree. There was a gap between the death of the MGB and the arrival of the MG Metro but when the MG Metro came along it came from the same stable (the same applies to the RV8 and MGF/TF).

    However, the MG6 and MG3 do not (in my opinion) come from that same bloodline. MGR died in 2005 and the fact that parts of its corpse went to China does not mean that it is alive, well and speaking Mandarin.

    The new cars are new products from a new (to the UK) company and just happen to wear the MG badge. You may be happy to call them real MGs, but I can’t bring myself to do so because I don’t believe that they are. In my opinion it’s as if Nestle had gone bust, Mars had bought the rights to the Kit Kat name and decided to stick a Kit Kat label on a Mars bar. It may say Kit Kat on the outside, but no amount of labeling and advertising will ever convince me that it’s not a Mars bar. That doesn’t stop Mars bars from being decent chocolate but they’ll never be Kit Kats!

  52. Simon Woodward says:

    @Ianto
    Very true – if you look at car DNA, an MG ZS is, after all, a Japanese Honda, an MGF a ‘back to front’ Austin Metro, an MG ZR is half Honda, half Maestro and the MG ZT was part-designed, like the MINI, by Germans at BMW. You can go back further – a Midget was a re-bodied Austin Healey which was based on a Austin A30/35, all very fine cars.

    Talking of ‘the Fiendish Johnny Foreigner’, without BMW’s investment we wouldn’t have had the current hugely successful Range Rover or the money to develop the rest of the range. Ford USA’s efforts gave us the equally successful Aston Martin and Jaguar. Talk to the thousands of car workers at Nissan Washington, Toyota Derby, Honda Swindon, Vauxhall Ellesmere Port etc. and the huge amount of jobs these plants generate for their local economy and suppliers.

    What really matters is not whether MG is Chinese or MINI is German but that they are, at least, providing ‘REAL JOBS FOR REAL WORKERS’ – sentiment and nostalgia don’t put food on the table or pay the gas bill.

    Who knows, if MG gets it right and does decide to increase capacity to a workforce of just 4k then, at least, they will be doing something POSITIVE to reduce the growing unemployment rather than bleating about how MG used to be: a fine collection cars with very mixed and confused DNA.

  53. Geoff says:

    The fact that the car is going to be manufactured in China doesn’t matter one jot. I would suggest that, if people are so concerned that MGs should be made in the UK, then they should have bought MG Rover cars when they were MADE in the UK – people didn’t because they thought and were told that buying a foreign car was better – when, in fact, it wasn’t.

    The MG3 will sell if it ticks all the right boxes.

    Oh, and in response to the person who thinks that its got a 1.5 litre engine and is only developing 95 bhp (107bhp) so it’s less powerful and that makes it less exciting, well that depends on how this engine delivers it power. Hence, if like the 1.4K, its peak torque is near 4000 rpm, it’s not very promising but, if it’s peaking around 3000 rpm and it’s in a lighter body, it’s going to be much better.

    The MG3’s only down side is one common to all car maufacturers who insist on having dark, Germanic interiors – this only covers up the fact that the interiors of cars are generally mobile skips and it hides the dirt. Let’s get back to having lighter interiors.

  54. Wilko says:

    Ianto :
    BMW continue to invest in the MINI and continue to build in the UK, yet certain posters keep harking back to the pre-Phoenix days and laying all blame with BMW. I am surprised that they are not bringing the Second World War into their arguments, such is the nature of their xenophobia.

    The simple fact is, when BMW got bored of their Rover experiment, they could have sold the firm on, as a viable, going concern to another outfit interested in running it. Instead, they asset-stripped it. They flogged off Land Rover separately to the highest bidder and kept the MINI replacement for themselves, leaving the remaining bit that became MGR to an inevitable fate.

    It’s nothing to do with the Second World War and it’s nothing to do with xenophobia, which is actually a very offensive thing to suggest.

  55. Jonathan Carling Jonathan Carling says:

    There is quite a lot of old Mini DNA in the new MINI – not in the components used or the engineering, but in the styling and aspects of the design. It’s also built in the same factory as old Minis, by the same workforce, and uses the same name. However, that doesn’t stop it being a pastiche though and it’s certainly aimed at a different market.

    It makes more sense to think of the new MINI as a replacement for the old Mini AND the old Metro. That’s how it was conceived, even if it moved away from their market. A range featuring MINI, Rover 55 and Rover 75 would have been a good successor for Honda-era Rover. The trouble is, only the MINI survived.

    Finally, as for the new MGs, from what we’ve read on this site there seems to be some carry-over body engineering from the Rover 75 in the MG6 – so, in a convoluted way, there is some ‘old MG’ DNA in the new ones. I wouldn’t want to argue that point too strongly though!

  56. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    There are maybe some DNA traces on the 75/ZT line at Longbridge.

    CSI Bromsgrove would know…

  57. Brian says:

    Good news for Richard Moss: an article in the Birmingham Post on Will Riley includes a statement that he is to launch a new, renamed version of the MG SV in March.

    Good Luck.

  58. Ianto says:

    @Wilko
    Whatever, it is still no excuse for the anti-MINI brigade.

  59. Wilko says:

    Ianto :
    Whatever, it is still no excuse for the anti-MINI brigade.

    Ah yes, that most intelligent and considered of responses. I’ll bear it in mind…

  60. Johnos1984 says:

    It’s good to see a smaller model which should, hopefully, steal sales away from the competition. This would be a far better launch model than the MG6.

    However, I don’t see why anyone who has an MG ZR would want one. The MG3’s styling is tame and confused, it’s a mash of different styles. I can even spot a CityRover in the rear quarter panel. Indeed, to be honest, it’s more of a bland box which will blend in with the rest of the tat driving around. Sadly, I suspect that the MG3 will only appeal to the older buyer unless they really improve the interior and give it good handling like the Z range.

  61. Keith B says:

    @Keith Adams
    I’ve been immersed in this site every day since its inception and fully understand and share the passion for the (ex)UK car industry.

    However, there does appear to be a fascination with this crap from China which has little more than a tenuous link to BMC/MGR. British Designers and Engineers may be employed at Longbridge but, given that the next MG/Roewe may be a re-badged Insignia, where is the link other than a nameplate?

    I am interested in what the Chinese are up to but please put it in the correct perspective.

  62. Keith B says:

    @Simon Woodward
    All MGs have been variants of regular production cars or made up from the parts bin. All the cars you mention have, at least, benefited from some of the continuity which is lacking or seriously diluted in the Chinese MGs.

  63. Jonathan Carling Jonathan Carling says:

    @Keith B
    You may or may not be right about the importance of the new MGs. However, the subject is generating a lot of correspondence here! That shows a high degree of interest and, of course, if they were called something else, then there would be none of that. They aren’t, they’re called MGs and that’s the point.

    Isn’t it still a bit soon to be calling them ‘crap’?

  64. Keith B says:

    @Richard Moss
    Well said, I agree with your sentiments exactly. We are not knocking the Chinese effort, just expressing our views on an emotive subject.

    @Keith Adams
    Your “This is my site” comment is a bit OTT – I have a lot to thank you for Keith in rekindling my passion and memories but surely what you have created belongs to all of us now.

  65. Keith B says:

    @Jonathan Carling
    I am not calling the cars “crap” – just referencing some of the hysteria this subject has whipped up.

  66. Keith B says:

    @Paul T
    The Austins which were built in Australia, Spain and South Africa etc. were built using Longbridge financing, engineers and parts and so are/were Austins. What if I had bought the Austin name from BMW and stuck it on my Bentley – would that be an Austin Arnage? Thought not.

  67. Hilton Davis says:

    I’ve just been looking at a new Kia Rio and it looks very similar to the MG3 but doesn’t seem to have a temperature guage either. A Rio wouldn’t be my first choice of car but it looks reasonable, seems to be competitively priced and has that 7 year warranty. Perhaps SAIC Motor/MG should take a leaf out of Kia’s book?

  68. Steven211 says:

    The new Kia Rio looks nothing like an MG3.

    I think cars without temperature gauges have an alarm or warning light. Besides the engine shouldn’t overheat if it has been made and looked after properly lol.

  69. Wilko says:

    @Steven211
    You shouldn’t need a rev counter if you’ve got ears, I suppose…

  70. Steven211 says:

    Yep, a good driver doesn’t need a rev counter anyway – I don’t look at my rev counter.

  71. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Keith B
    Well, if you had bought the name and stuck it on a car you had designed and built yourself, then it would be an Austin. Your comparison is farcical and is why these blogs turn into mere slagging matches and point-scoring squabbles. Oh, and showing off.

    To paraphrase a quote from an episode of ‘The Young Ones’, “I’ve got a Bentley!”

  72. Vavavoom says:

    The MG3 looks to be a tidy modern hatch, but it’s only an MG in name. Efforts need to be made now in preserving what BMC to MGR stuff remains because it’s all over!

    Good luck SAIC Motor – maybe in 10 years there will be production like MINI at Cowley, worldwide sales and a fantastic image but, until then, you won’t have my hard-earned… I really hope I am proven wrong.

  73. Richard Moss says:

    @Antony Blackwell

    Antony Blackwell :
    Remember MGs have always been mainstream production cars which had the MG badge added to them. Rovers cars were either developed with the help of Honda (rebodied Legends/Concertos/Civics) or BMW and then we had the demise with the ‘Phoenix Four’ and we all know what happened there!

    Sorry – I’ve only just seen this.

    Anthony, you need to cast your mind back further than 10 years because MG have (over the years) produced as many unique cars as they have re-badged models. That started in the 1920s with “Old Number One” and continued right through to the mid-engined F/TF via the J types, M types, SA, VA, WA, T types, A, B, C, RV8 etc. They may have used Austin and Morris running gear but that was common practice either side of WW2 – for example, many Morris cars were powered by French Hotchkiss engines.

  74. Keith B says:

    @Paul T
    Let’s set the record straight.

    1) I fully support Keith Adams and AROnline
    2) I welcome the Chinese keeping the MG name in the public eye
    3) I resent the fact that negative criticism is verboten
    4) I have made no personal attacks merely made my feelings clear
    5) So what if I own(ed) a Bentley – being accused of showing off is just childishness or jealousy
    6) I actually dislike the Bentley (Phaeton) Continental for the same reason I am against Chinese “MG” although I acknowledge the difference being run by good managers has made to Bentley
    7) Freedom of speech – “We are all entitled to believe we are right in what we say despite being so obviously wrong”

  75. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Keith B
    It’s not jealous or childish – I just didn’t see why you had to drop that in. I personally have no interest in Bentleys or any other prestige cars as I probably couldn’t afford one or the running costs associated with it. However, that does not automatically make me green with envy of those who do. Good luck to them, they’ve obviously worked very hard to pay for their privileges.

    Anyway, returning once more to the point in question, your comparison was unrealistic and doesn’t add weight to those who claim the current cars aren’t ‘real’ MGs. The fact is MGR was bought by Nanjing, which merged with/was taken over by SAIC Motor, which has a base at Longbridge and uses MG in the company name. That lineage seems fairly straightforward to me.

    Freedom of speech – I have no argument with you there and, as I said earlier, there are some on here (not you in particular) whose mission seems to be merely to stir things up, antagonise and belittle others and generally create an atmosphere of unpleasantness that detracts from the substance of each blog. It makes people think twice about posting comments on here as the chances are they will be shot down in flames from some other well-read ‘expert’ (who has to use brackets for emphasis for the benefit of the Stupid People). You can now sit and practically set your watch waiting for arrival of the negative remarks from said individuals, regardless of the subject matter. Their sole motive appears to be trouble.

    They would be better going to sites or forums where it is positively encouraged to mouth off at each other without making any obvious constructive argument about anything in particular…

  76. Keith Adams Keith Adams says:

    AROnline: supporting and encouraging free speech, whether you are for or against what’s on the site :).

    /K

  77. Keith B says:

    @Paul T
    Paul, I am here for several reasons, information, lively(!) debate and nostalgia. I sympathise with your sentiments but disagree with your concept of lineage and continuity.

    My opinion is that management and unions destroyed the British manufacturing industry aided and abetted by ignorant and ill-informed politicians. I did find your “Bentley” reference childish whether or not that was the intention. It’s such a shame that our mutual passion for one of the largest car makers on the planet wasn’t shared by all those involved in its demise.

  78. Keith B says:

    @Keith Adams
    I can’t argue with that and, for the record Mr. Adams, I wholeheartedly support your efforts and would be lost if not for my daily “fix”. That we don’t see eye to eye on everything is what makes us what we are.

    Incidentally, is there any chance of getting some more Rootes/Chrysler articles? That dovetails well with the BMC saga. Thanks.

  79. Richard Moss says:

    @Paul T
    I’d better not tell you that I own a Jaguar, then, or that will also count against me. That’s in addition to a Rover 200 Cabrio and an MGC GT so I have a bit of BL/BMC.

    I have to smile every time I read one of your posts. You accuse me of being patronising yet yours are the most patronising posts on here. Every one else is “wrong” or “unrealistic” to you and having a contrary opinion marks them out as “troublemakers”. They don’t have different opinions, they’re just “wrong”, “unrealistic” or “troublemaking”. You even go so far as to tell me to “get a life” at one point which really is the last resort of someone who finds it difficult to accept that others may not see the world as they do.

    Here’s a thought for contributors to ponder:

    What are your opinions on the fact that Fiat is going to sell Chryslers as Lancias? Are they real Lancias or just cynical rebadging exercises? All opinions valid – no-one will be considered a troublemaker for not agreeing with my point of view.

  80. Wilko says:

    @Richard Moss
    @Paul T
    I don’t wish to boast but I once owned a Rover 800 – you know, the thinking man’s Bentley. I have also had a Metro as well though, so hopefully that makes me prole enough to offer a view…

    Anyway, on the Lancia thing, I would apply the same criteria as I do for MG. Hence, if they are BASED on Chryslers but developed by Lancia, in tune with the company’s heritage, and built in Italian Lancia factories, then fair enough. However, if they simply ARE Chryslers, with the only change being a different badge and bit of trim, then it’s just a cynical con and, in my view, pretty objectionable.

  81. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Richard Moss
    @Wilko
    OK, I give up, you’re right.

  82. Antony Blackwell says:

    @Richard Moss
    I was only going back the odd 15/20 years but, yes, you are right – if needed, you could go way back further.

    Who would think that one car would cause such debate?! Have SAIC Motor got what they wanted… people talking about their product, good or bad as it is?

  83. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Richard Moss
    Before I go away with the other deaf imbiciles, I did not direct the ‘get a life’ comment at you personally – if you are going to quote me and criticise me, which you are perfectly entitled to do, then at least make sure your statements are accurate.

    Finally, I was not the one and only person who accused you of arrogance, so again at least direct your venom at EVERYONE who has committed the same “offences” as me rather than singling me out… something which some may say is tantamount to bullying.

  84. Richard Moss says:

    Paul T :
    @Richard Moss
    @Keith B
    Look, if a car is built in a factory (Chinese or British) by a company which owns the name and puts the badge on it, then it’s an MG. Austins were still Austins when built in UK, Spain, Australia, Belgium etc. Stop nitpicking and get a life.

    Indeed, you did not direct that quote just at me – you included the other person who has been most notable in disagreeing with you. What other conclusion are we meant to draw other than that it was “personal”?

  85. Richard Moss says:

    Oh, and why the umbrage when Keith B mentioned that he has a Bentley? That certainly looked “personal.”

  86. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Richard Moss
    As I said, you win.

  87. vavavoom says:

    Badging Chryslers as Lancias is cynical.

  88. Keith B says:

    @Richard Moss
    Lancia badged Chryslers are Chryslers. Does anyone recall the case of a UK dealer being successfully prosecuted for selling Japanese-market Toyotas as Lexus because Toyota said they weren’t? (despite being all but identical bar trim and badging)

    I don’t think any of us will convince each other of what is right in this argument and so we should just respect our “opponents'” points of view.

  89. James C says:

    I have to say I am not the biggest fan of the new Chinese MGs but the MG3 has something about it – I think that, if priced right, this could be a good alternative to a Hyundai or Kia.

    I keep finding myself looking at the latest Honda Civic and thinking that should have an MG or Rover badge on it.

    Great website, by the way.

  90. David Whittington says:

    The more I see of the MG3, the more I like it. I think that, as long as it’s well made and priced correctly, it’ll sell.

    However, the one thing that puzzles me is that, if the MG3 is a Ford Fiesta/VW Polo rival and the MG6 is a Ford Focus/VW Golf rival, where does that leave the MG5/Roewe 350 in he line up?

  91. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    David Whittington :
    The more I see of the MG3, the more I like it. I think that, as long as it’s well made and priced correctly, it’ll sell.

    However, the one thing that puzzles me is that, if the MG3 is a Ford Fiesta/VW Polo rival and the MG6 is a Ford Focus/VW Golf rival, where does that leave the MG5/Roewe 350 in he line up?

    I would guess that the MG5(?) certainly won’t be in the UK model range… I don’t have enough knowledge of the Chinese car market to know which models the three cars are competing against over there, but there must be a sector for the MG5(?)/Roewe 350.

  92. Wilko says:

    @David Whittington
    I don’t actually know because, like most people, I *still* haven’t seen any of the cars for real but, perhaps, you could express it as:

    MG3 = Rover Metro
    MG5 = Rover 200/25
    MG6 = Rover 400/45

  93. @David Whittington
    @Paul T
    @Wilko
    MG Motor UK’s take would appear to be that, while the MG6 straddles the C and D-segments (i.e. a D-segment sized car at a C-segment price), the MG3 will be pitched right at the heart of the B-segment.

    A Roewe 350-based MG5(?) Hatchback would clearly be a C-segment contender but AROnline reckons that MG’s third European/UK model will probably be a C-segment SUV/Crossover. See: SUV in MG launch plans, John McIlroy, Autocar.co.uk, 28th February, 2011.

    Autocar quotes MG Motor UK’s Sales and Marketing Director, Guy Jones, as saying: “There will be at least three volume vehicles in our range before we build a sports car,” and adds that, when asked if one could be a crossover, he said, “It could be an SUV, yes. We’ll test a crossover vehicle next year in China.”

  94. Simon says:

    The MG3 does seem to be a mainstream B-segment car right in the middle of Ford Fiesta, Vauxhall Corsa and VW Polo. I guess, in that sense, it is more of a spiritual successor to the Austin/MG Metro than the Rover 25/MG ZR which was always on the big side and with quite poor packaging.

    Whilst not setting the world alight, the car looks modern and the interior looks better than the MG6’s. I think it will sell if priced against Punto – £9995 to £12995. Let’s hope it goes as well as it looks!

  95. Ianto says:

    @Simon
    I would hope that it’s pricing is similar to that in China, if that was the case then it would clean up.

  96. RoastBeef says:

    I agree with every word Richard Moss has posted and, in my opinion, he was not being arrogant, but simply, accurately and clearly stating the truth. I’ve enjoyed reading his posts, they are refreshing in their honesty.

    The new MG is just a badge on a cheap foreign car. The MG badge serves no purpose other than to try to fool the buying public, that they would be getting some heritage or inherent quality by purchasing this car. It is rather like a fake Chinese Rolex watch – a badge or label, but no more.

  97. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @RoastBeef
    This wouldn’t be Richard using an alias would it or, maybe, his brother??

  98. Lizzie A says:

    I actually think Paul T speaks the truth and is most honest.

    Incidentally, if you want to talk about badges on cars making them something they’re not, what’s all this with Bentley badges on Rolls-Royces??

  99. Wilko says:

    Lizzie A :Incidentally, if you want to talk about badges on cars making them something they’re not, what’s all this with Bentley badges on Rolls-Royces??

    Nobody said MG was the only offender, did they?

  100. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Wilko
    No they didn’t.

    I often feel that if you took half of the cars on the road today, removed the badges and lined them up you would struggle to tell who made them.

  101. Wilko says:

    I agree. I always thought one of the great things about the MGR range was that the cars looked distinctive. There seem to be few affordable cars on the market today which could be described as such. I like the new Saab 9-5 for that reason. I suppose Proton are quite brave in their designs as well, although I imagine the cars are pretty naff to drive.

  102. Richard Moss says:

    @Paul T

    Paul T :
    @RoastBeef
    This wouldn’t be Richard using an alias would it or, maybe, his brother??

    Sorry to blow your conspiracy theory out of the water, but you are wrong on both counts.

    However, it IS someone telling it like it is!

  103. Steven211 says:

    The MG Z cars were fantastic, a pleasure to drive, but the MG ZS was a Honda Civic and the ZR was based on an old Honda platform, so both were originally foreign. People make me laugh when the call the MG3 a cheap foreign car. The MG ZR and ZS were cheap cars as well, their interior plastics were poor compared to most rivals at the time, they were quite ugly in my opinion, but they drive well and that is what MG is about: fun and affordability.

    MG Rover are dead and always will be now. This is a new era – MG now has the financial backing of a major car manufacturer and the cars are designed and developed in the UK. People can’t expect perfection from a new car company and MG are, basically, just that. I bet that, if MG Rover had made the new cars which we are now seeing, then they would like the cars…

  104. Ianto says:

    For sure, the MG3 will be a massive hit in the UK.

  105. Jonathan Carling Jonathan Carling says:

    There very few cars on the market today which are designed, engineered and built from components made in one country. Japanese cars are largely the exception to this.

  106. Hilton Davis says:

    @Steven211
    I’m sorry you don’t agree the new Kia Rio looks a bit like the MG3. I didn’t say it looked identical! However, the grille mesh, headlamps and body profile/size are fairly similar. Mind you, for that matter so are lots of today’s “Tin Cans” on wheels…

  107. Steven211 says:

    Hilton Davis :
    @Steven211

    I’m sorry you don’t agree the new Kia Rio looks a bit like the MG3. I didn’t say it looked identical! However, the grille mesh, headlamps and body profile/size are fairly similar. Mind you, for that matter so are lots of today’s “Tin Cans” on wheels…

    All cars look the same now lol.

  108. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @Richard Moss
    My apologies – judging by some of his posts on other threads, Mr RoastBeef is obviously someone on the wind-up.

  109. RoastBeef says:

    @Paul T
    Other posts, which posts are you referring too? I think I’ve only made three or four other posts ever on this site, all relating to the Jaguar XJ and my experience of owning them. Nothing controversial or intended to ‘wind-up’ anyone.

    You seem to be unable to cope with the fact that I disagree with you and agree with Mr Moss – all this talk of being an alias or brother is silly. It’s not very welcoming if someone new makes a few posts of his genuine opinion and happens to disagree with you, only to be branded a wind-up merchant and another poster in disguise. Charming! What utter tosh you talk.

  110. RoastBeef says:

    Ianto :
    For sure, the MG3 will be a massive hit in the UK.

    I really don’t think it will be a hit but we will, of course, have to wait and see.

    I reckon that the public will be rather confused as to exactly where this car’s niche is. Is it supposed to be more prestigious than a similar-sized Ford? More sporty than a Vauxhall? What is the USP?

    I suspect that, when it comes to spending one’s own money, most people will worry about re-sale value and give the MG a miss. Maybe, if MG Motor manage to get some big contracts with the fleet managers, then the MG3 might do ok. However, there is so much choice out there, why would anyone spend their own money on an MG with its unknown reliability and residuals?

  111. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    @RoastBeef
    “There is nothing ‘horrible’ about a BMW Compact – it is actually a very good car and you sound rather foolish and ill-informed making such comments.”

    So this wasn’t you, then?

  112. Merlin Milner says:

    I quite like it in a sort of 5 door Fiat 500 way.

    Someone in an earlier post said “plastic appears to be white and consequently cheap.” Well, that is utter nonsense – tell that to Apple and their white premium products. I think that the interior is very good and much better than the blinginess we get from many EU manufacturers.

  113. RoastBeef says:

    Paul T :
    @RoastBeef
    “There is nothing ‘horrible’ about a BMW Compact – it is actually a very good car and you sound rather foolish and ill-informed making such comments.”
    So this wasn’t you, then?

    It was me in one of the posts I referred to about Jaguars. I see you got yourself into a bit of a paranoid tiz last night on that thread. I am not here to argue with anyone, so I think that I will just ignore you from now on.

  114. RoastBeef says:

    Merlin Milner :
    I quite like it in a sort of 5 door Fiat 500 way.

    I like the Fiat 500, it looks different (although you can clearly see the lineage from the old 500) stylish and solid. However, to me the MG3 looks more like a cross between a VW Polo and a Vauxhaul Corsa – it doesn’t look especially unique. It’s not a bad looking car at all, but not sufficiently special, to make it something to lust after.

    The Fiat has a ‘designer’ quality about it, which the MG3 lacks. The premium Apple products have the ‘designer’ look in spades and I’m sure that is a major reason why they sell so well – this MG just doesn’t have that allure.

  115. Steven211 says:

    According to what car the MG3 will need major changes before it comes to the UK…
    http://www.whatcar.com/car-news/mg3-supermini-not-in-uk-before-late-2012/255690

  116. Steven211 says:

    On What Car website it says that the MG3 will need major changes before it comes out in the UK…
    http://www.whatcar.com/car-news/mg3-supermini-not-in-uk-before-late-2012/255690

  117. Dr Bobby Love says:

    They spent so much time fixing the front they forgot to sort out the back.

    The MG3 could have been AWESOME if it wasn’t for the C-pillar treatment. It just seems to get progressively more fussy the further back you go. Was the nose restyled by Brits who were told that the C-pillar was “not to be changed” from the original model it’s based on? (Sounds familiar… Quick, bring out the saloon) The REAL MG3 will be along shortly. 😉

  118. Mark Pitchford says:

    @Dr Bobby Love
    The trouble is that, until you see any car in the metal, it is quite difficult to make much of a judgment. It’s obviously true that press photos will show what are perceived to be the best angles but, on the other hand, I can think of several cars I like much better than initial impressions of the car led me to think.

    I thought, for instance, that the TF was an abomination compared to the F until I saw one.

  119. Paul Taylor Paul T says:

    RoastBeef :

    Paul T :
    @RoastBeef

    “There is nothing ‘horrible’ about a BMW Compact – it is actually a very good car and you sound rather foolish and ill-informed making such comments.” So this wasn’t you, then?

    It was me in one of the posts I referred to about Jaguars. I see you got yourself into a bit of a paranoid tiz last night on that thread. I am not here to argue with anyone, so I think that I will just ignore you from now on.

    Thanks, that would be appreciated.

  120. Ayd Instone says:

    It’s funny how we all have different definitions on what a real Austin, MG or whatever is depending on whether we like the owners or not. Weren’t the brands and companies of BMC bought and merged numerous times in their history?

    SAIC Motor own the brand, the factory and have a handful of the workers from a company that was created by Phoenix who bought assets from BMW who bought it from BAe who bought it from H.M. Government which restarted a business that had gone bust. Where does reality begin and end?

    The proof will be whether people buy the new MGs – if they do, they believe they’re MGs.

    I’m not going to buy a Cadbury’s Creme Egg since the company’s not family-owned anymore so it’s not a real Creme Egg.

  121. Rovex says:

    For me who makes the car isnt really the issue, its how it feels. IF the MG3 feels like a car that could have been made and designed by the company that ended up as MG-Rover then its a valid MG. If it feels like a cheap chinese knock-off with badge engineering then its not. Its that simple.

    The Mini.. The car is good, if over priced and over complex in places, but it isnt an MG-Rover anymore because it was stolen by BMW. The car isnt bad, what it stands for certainly is. The recent additions like the clubman ARE however bad, and frankly ridiculous.

    The 1 series BMW? Its a decent car but there are bad bits about it. Its ride is poor and sorry but its damn ugly from every angle, i mean really grotesque.

  122. Ianto says:

    @Rovex
    I agree – hopefully, SAIC Motor will address any quality issues in the same way that they have dealt with them on the MG6.

    I think the MG3 will be a massive hit in the UK, particularly if MG offer the range of personalisation that is available on the MINI and DS3. I love the union flag vinyl on the roof.

    I reckon that, if pitched below £8000 and matching at least the quality of an i10, then it should fly out of the showroom.

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