Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Spitfire

The Triumph Spitfire came about as a direct response to the release of the Austin-Healey Sprite (and subsequently MG Midget). Just as with the the TRs before it, Triumph found itself playing catch-up to Abingdon, and ended up producing a sports car to answer its rival, but which eventually improved on it in many significant ways.

The Spitfire was underpinned by a Herald-style separate chassis, and was powered by the same family of engines. But it was a lovely-looking sports car, with Michelotti-penned styling and a closely-cropped interior for two. Fun to drive, and somehow more appealing than the MG Midget, the Spitfire ended up outliving itse deadly rival by a year, making it to 1980.

Today, the Spitfire remains cheap and plentiful, meaning they’re easy to keep on the road thanks to near-total parts supply, but low values often mean full restorations are a matter of the heart, not the head. And these are the cars to buy.


Reviews, blogs and news stories

Concepts and prototypes : Triumph Fury

Concepts and prototypes : Triumph Fury

The Triumph Fury was a little more than a motor show crowd pleaser – it was a hint at what Triumph could really achieve with its sports car range during the 1960s. Shame this show concept didn’t make it into production… It was a huge missed opportunity.

Marques : Triumph Story – Part One

Marques : Triumph Story – Part One

Triumph’s history was an interesting one but, following bankruptcy on the eve of World War II, it was left to The Standard Motor Company to pick up the baton and shape Triumph’s brave new world…