Blog : With the changing of the season…

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Keith Adams

Driving at night isn't as ideal as this image would portray... in middle England, at least.
Driving at night isn't as ideal as this image would portray... in middle England, at least.

It’s been just over a week since the clocks changed over, and it looks like the population of the fragrant East Midlands of England has still to adjust to the fact. Okay, so it was rainy, grimy, and yucky on the way home this evening, but on my modest 15-mile commute from Octane Towers to AROnline Towers the driving public demonstrated breathtaking ineptitude. Actually, I’ll go further – for some mad reason, it appeared that at least a dozen people took complete leave of their senses, and in crass displays of sheer and unutterable stupidity, did their best to run us off the road – from in front, behind, and to the side…

I had vans pulling out of side roads, Vauxhalls tailgating, and Nissans diving at us on roundabouts. In short, it was sheer hell. Not entirely sure why Northamptonshire was driving angry this evening – whether it’s something in the water, everyone’s skint, or the rain did its best to turn a few people into brainless idiots, but put it this way – I was relieved to get home without having been involved in a limb-severing RTA. Okay, so maybe I’m exaggerating a little bit, but it really did feel a little dangerous out there.

Bunch of buggers!

A week in, I reckon it’s down to the clock change – and that hour we gained to take us back to GMT from BST. It’s obviously unsettled drivers, who now find themselves driving home in the dark. And that leads me to ask the question – why on earth do we have the clock change anyway? Who does it benefit? What is its purpose in the 21st century, and why does this anachronism continue when it obviously causes more problems than it solves?

If someone can explain it to me, I’d be really grateful – because at the moment, I’m confused. Although that’s not overly difficult.

Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it up to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Classics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasible adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

53 Comments

  1. We put our clocks back this past Saturday 11/5/2011- it didn’t matter,we have the same idiots on the road too- interesting I thought the idiot drivers were just in the USA.

  2. I had a rather unusual experience last week in the highlands in Scotland. A car pulled out in front of me then indicated left and slowed down so I over took it assuming he was pulling in or letting me by.

    Next thing I know he is tailgating me, flashing his lights and was giving me a gesture which I can only assume meant he was looking for me to give him some ‘relief’.

    I’m still puzzled over what he thought I did wrong but, I have to agree with you Keith, the roads in the past week have been full of loons

  3. Three accidents in Stafford tonight leaving sections of the M6 and the A34 closed making it very interesting for people to get home.

    And since when was it ok for people to pull out on roundabouts in front of vehicles already using it? I must have missed that update to the Highway Code!

  4. It’s those drivers who don’t use their lights that gets me, especially grey BMW’s for some reason. Improvements in car safety seem to have upset normal Darwinian selection…

    I also wish they would make faulty bulb replacement part of the driving test since it’s something that motorists seem increasingly incapable of.

  5. We live in Darlington and hence only experience 2 lane dual carriageways which are naturally self regulating.(If you can’t go you can’t go) During the summer I ventured to Manchester Airport via the M62 etc When merging onto the M56 ( 5 lanes?)I waited for a fast approaching vehicle to overtake before pulling out onto the slow lane of the M56. Said idiot screamed passed at my speed plus about 30mph and then attempted to suck my offside headlight out of it’s socket by immediately turning off the motorway.

  6. @ Chris
    Well, yes, but you increasingly need an Electronics Degree to change headlamps these days – much too complicated for the average car owner.

    And the sooner they ban wretched Xenons, the better.

  7. I presume the accompanying CGI has been inverted from a shot of an LHD, otherwise the bird really is pushing the revs and mph a bit…

  8. “It’s those drivers who don’t use their lights that gets me, especially grey BMW’s for some reason”

    Most BMW’s seem to have a wiring fault, i’ve noticed you can’t use the indicators while the front fog lights are on. Which is annoying as the front fog lights seem to come on by default when you turn the key.

    “I also wish they would make faulty bulb replacement part of the driving test since it’s something that motorists seem increasingly incapable of.”

    The incapability is sadly down to design on a lot of cars now. There are even some where one has to remove the front bumper in order to replace a bulb! Headlamp bulbs don’t go that often though, the last pair in my mini lasted 5 years of daily use. I suppose if you only drove around town on lit streets the loss of a bulb wouldn’t be that obvious, but most modern cars have some form of bulb failure warning, which drivers just ignore.

  9. My journey to the office when I go there is 3 miles away. Every now and again we have what I call ‘Tosser morning’ when a unbeliveable amount of people do incredibly stupid things on the road – maybe even me I don’t know. Can’t link it to the weather or time of year or anything.
    I do a lot of travelling too and increasingly notice how many large German cars drive about (usually too fast and too close) with no lights on when really they should be on especially in fog. I assume these cars have automatic head lights and the driver is so stupid he does not realise they can actually turn them on manually. My Renault has got this and about 50% of the time it is me who puts them on because I think they need to be on.
    In over 30 years driving I have never had a bad accident I put this down to really not believing I am a particularly good driver – confident yes, but not good enough to stop if I am driving like a lunatic. So I don’t.

  10. Keith,
    Just the same here in the “killing fields” of East Anglia, the A17. Just got a 9 month job 3 miles from home though so should be OK.

    Drove into Spalding last week and noticed that the anti drink drive signs are up, on the right side of the road, and in Polish only.I think I’ll stay at home in front of the fire after dark.

  11. Something in the water maybe. Had a strange one, came up behind a car which was parked but setting off. I was quite close so I thought it a little rude, but nothing a little lifting of the right foot couldn’t put right.

    I was following this car for a while and he kept stopping. But when I went to pass he would pull out. Did this 3 or 4 times until the penny dropped – he wanted me to stop for a “chat”.

    So I did. He got our of his car and approached with an angry face. I got out (not tall and I have pipe-cleaner arms) but he was a typical 6 stone, 70+ type. He decided not to persue the chat but got back in and went off.

    I have no idea what I did. No flashing, no signals, nothing from me – life’s too short to get annoyed at everyone being a prat.

    The strangest part ? It was an AA driving school car.

  12. I’ve just applied for a job in Northampton and I live in Nottingham… Sounds like the commute (if I get it) should be a laugh then.. Glad I bought a diesel though 😀 Win!

  13. @ Chris 4, Magnus 7 & Dennis 10
    I used to think badly of drivers who drove around for months with bulbs out, until I had a Peugeot 206 GTi about 7 years ago. When the drivers side headlamp bulb went I had to unbolt the engine management box to get (barely) adequate access to get to the bulb and replace it, so I can see why they go un replaced. Not long after, I heard a rumour that BMW’s nowadays need the engine managment re programming after a bulb change – not sure how true this is, but it seems the manufacturers want you to go to their dealers for everything now – including basic road safety items like changing a bulb where they will charge large sums for small pieces of work. But you are right Chris – this is wrong and people should be made to learn how to do this and manufacturers should be made by law to make it easy, not hard to do. I have rebelled against the system now – that 206 was replaced by an Audi A3 which was worse for DIY maintenance and that has now been replaced by an MG Midget – there is nothing I cannot do on that!!! (I am lucky though – I live 1.5 miles from work so I walk) Although I live in Yorkshire I have to drive to Tamworth a week next Friday so am dreading it based on what you guys have been saying. The Midget will stay at home cosy in its garage – I will be in my wifes’ company Mini Cooper SD – I hope a bulb does not blow!

  14. As far as I’m aware, if the clocks weren’t put back by an hour, sunrise wouldn’t take place in the north of Scotland until nearly 10 o’clock in the morning in the middle of December. It’s grim up north…

  15. I have had my 5 year old Renault scenic for 18 months – in that time both dipped head light bulbs have blown – bad luck I guess. The hand book says go to the dealers at once.
    Being a technical person and having hands that are not that big I replaced them without too much trouble. Luckily they are ordinary halogen lamps not the later projector type with a power supply on the back.
    In France where Big Bertha was made it is required by law to carry replacement light bulbs in the car (I assume still that is the case) surely that is now a joke??
    It is time that manufacturers are forced to provide easy means for average owners to carry out mundane tasks.

  16. Standards have dropped off the cliff since it became unacceptable to use the horn. Years ago, the typical wazzock at the wheel could take the hint of horn usage before their standards slipped too far.

  17. Liability. I get shouted at if I beep at people, because from an insurance perspective, I could be liable if my beeping caused them to have (as opposed to think about how they nearly caused, of course) an accident. My girlfriend worked in the relevant bit of the insurance industry, dealing with claims, and it’s astounding where the buck stops sometimes.

    Similarly, I get told off if I so much as think about flashing my lights at a middle-lane-owner, but casually drifting past them in the traffic flow on the inside seems okay. What I’d much rather do is ram the buggers back to the lane they should be in, before completing the pass and moving back to the inside lane myself.

    I’m one of those annoying gits who just leaves the C3’s lights on, as it lacks DRLs and the lights go on/off with the ignition. I generally switch lights on as soon as I’m in the car, unless I have a specific reason not to do so – and think day running lights should be mandatory, but not necessarily in the form of LEDs that obscure indicators (I’m looking at VAG here, though Audis do dim their DRL if the owner can be bothered to signal).

  18. Top tip for drivers who like to leave their front fogs on in clear weather, put your wipers on when it’s not raining, you will look doubly cool!

  19. I think it was the recent full moon that seemed to bring the fools out in force.

    The ones that use sidelights + fogs instead of headlights.
    The ones that have a headlight out so use the full beam on the other one.
    The German cars on roundabouts that think everyone else is psychic and the indicator stalk is not required.
    The German cars that think that lane markings do not apply to teutonics, just to continue on the emptiest lane then try and cut in at the last minute.
    The LWB vans on roundabouts that think the rule is no longer ‘give way to traffic on roundabout’, but ‘give way to the larger vehicle’.
    People carriers in the outside lane of the motorway (most motorways in NI are 2 lane – we don’t even have a ‘middle lane’ to complain about!)
    Tailgaters on dark, wet, winding, narrow twisty rural roads, when you are trying to be careful to avoid the occasional pedestrian / cyclist!
    Cyclists who still insist on wearing dark clothing, having no lights, going through a red light at a traffic light junction, then proceeding at extremely slow pace on the road, beside the footpath-allocated cyclelane, uphill.

  20. Keith, I couldn’t agree more – it’s archaic to do what we currently do.

    I do feel however, that seasonal changes to clocks are necessary, it’s just that we are currently making all the wrong changes.

    The Scots (or certainly some scottish political parties) have objected to proposed changes to daylight saving hours for decades, citing the fact that Scotland would suffer proportionately more than the rest of the UK. For example, the recent proposals are that during winter, the UK would remain on BST and in 2013 would actually move forward an extra hour during the winter, so rather than go back an hour now (leaving us in the dark by around 3:30 to 4:00pm by december) we would have daylight until around 6-7pm instead. This does mean that mornings would be darker, and in some far flung scottish places, dark until 9:30 to 10:00AM. However, given that English roads are far more congested than any Scottish road, and that some 85% of the uk population reside in congested England it seems to me that these changes are worth trying, even if it means Scotland decide to do their own thing. Whilst mornings would be darker, the busiest times, the early evening when people are desperate to get home would be lighter – not to mention the fact that that light can be better used to live life a little, rather than it currently being wasted in a morning when many people are in bed with the curtains closed.

    The Scottish representatives say this is nothing more than English MP’s wishing to place Scotland in darkness, and the UK parliament saying that the Scots will have a veto on any proposals (which seems highly undemocratic given I’ve already mentioned the make-up of the british population…)

    I say, give the busy roads of England light when it’s needed most, and let Scotland, if it so chooses, do whatever it likes. I for one can see a massive benefit to having daylight into the evenings.

  21. Must be showing my age when I say this but as I get older I feel the roads in every town,village and formerly quiet side roads are congested even late at night or earlier in mornings too.

    A few weeks ago on my late (10.45pm)drive home from work a VW Bora with no lights pulled sharply from a slip road in front of me and I had to swerve and change lane. I didn’t honk but flashed him twice to remind him about the lights.

    After overtaking him he seemed to tailgate me and I had a fear he was going to collide, so I in turn put on a bit of speed to “escape”. A few hundred yards later on a dual carriageway he overtook – honking his horn continuously (still with no lights!) then pulled ahead and turned right -at least he signalled! I memorised his reg number and considered phoning the police, but decided not to – all I wanted to do was get home safely… it’s not worth the hassle is it?

  22. The worst bit of driving in bad visability was a black Jaguar with no lights on doing at least 80mph in thick fog on the M60 a few months ago.

    I as often drive along the M66 & A56, with one lane each way at an average speed of 50mph & the other 85mph.

    so if you want to keep a steady 70 it’s only possible by doing a zig-zag between lanes avoiding the trundlers in front & street racers behind.

  23. “The German cars on roundabouts that think everyone else is psychic and the indicator stalk is not required.”

    And that’s a really problem if you’re in a truck trying to join the roundabout.

    “so if you want to keep a steady 70 it’s only possible by doing a zig-zag between lanes avoiding the trundlers in front & street racers behind.”

    That’s what you’re supposed to do, return to the left when the left hand lane is clear. Usually you’ll find the left hand lane is stuck at about 56mph (the maximum limited speed for lorries), providing you’re going faster than the traffic in the left hand lane and the left hand lane is full, then doing 70 in lane 2 is fine, the idiots behind wanting to drive faster, that’s their problem.

  24. I feel that automatic lights are another ‘time saving’ device that is fuelling a culture where noone (AROnline readers excepted) has to think or take responsibility for their actions any more – like there is (usually) someone or something blame these days, the teccy cars noawadays try to do the thinking for us (like its a ‘real hard ship’ to flick a switch to put lights on anyway!) The result – common sense goes out of the window. I dread to think about the current crop of learner drivers and their successors – if they are used to the car switching its own light on what will they do in daylight but rainy conditions, or if the sensor system fails? will they know what a light switch is? Will I held liable because I did not see them because they dont know how to switch their lights on or the manufacturer of their car made it so hard to fix a broken light bulb they thought they would leave it until the next service or MOT? I think I need a lie down…

  25. Modern cars make 70 seem like standing still. Even my tiny econobox C3 (sorry, I forget sarcasm is a bit hard in text – at 1200kg or so, and with headlights that begin where the 114 and SD1’s end, it’s a lump of a thing) is happier cruising at… speeds more appropriate to proposed changes to the law.

    When I drove the SD1 back, I was doing 65-70 – and that speed feels positively comfortable. Gently returning to the inside lane, overtaking in a chilled fashion. I did, a couple of weekends ago, give it a bit more welly down a dual carriageway – and it felt a lot more like an event, and a lot more exciting, than the same speed in anything modern.

    We’re all terrible drivers thanks to modern cars. But at least our five airbags and 500kg of additional metal and stuff will keep us alive when we inevitably collide.

  26. Why is it in slight mist or drizzle when you can still see miles ahead everyone puts their rear fogs on, yet in pea soup fog on the M6 last weekend most people had no lights on at all! Everyones an idiot except me.

  27. “I dread to think about the current crop of learner drivers and their successors – if they are used to the car switching its own light on what will they do in daylight but rainy conditions, or if the sensor system fails? will they know what a light switch is?”

    It probably will come to that yes, i mean put a 20 year old in a car with a manual choke and they’ll sit there cranking the thing over wondering why it doesn’t start.

    “We’re all terrible drivers thanks to modern cars. But at least our five airbags and 500kg of additional metal and stuff will keep us alive when we inevitably collide.”

    It has been said that the best way to make cars safer would be to fix a large metal spike to the centre of the steering wheel.

    “Why is it in slight mist or drizzle when you can still see miles ahead everyone puts their rear fogs on”

    Well to be fair they are quite effective in motorway spray. However there is a total lack of understanding from the general public in how to use fog lights. The book says “fog lights should be used when visibility is seriously reduced” ‘Seriously Reduced’ is given as approx 100 yard/Metres visibility. Fog, snow, heavy rain/spray can all reduce visibility.
    Being near the coast we get a lot of fog banks round here, you find a lot of idiots who don’t even bother with headlights in thick fog and those that do often leave them on for days afterwards even when the sun is shining.
    You don’t need rear fogs at night though, they just dazzle other drivers.

  28. i hope they dont fit fog sensors to cars,why we have autolights and rain sensing wipers is beyond me,are we that lazy or stupid that we need such a “convenience” feature?we all managed without them before.

  29. Auto lights I found to be mostly a waste of time, as at dusk, or foggy/rainy conditions, they didn’t come on unless it was pitch dark.
    Likewise auto wipers were useless in slightly drizzly rain.

    I am late 20s and have never driven a manual choke. I imagine the choke comes out to start, and gets pushed back in gradually as the engine heats up?

    Likewise though, I dread future generations that are used to self-parallel-parking, lane sensing, radar-guided-cruise-control assisted cars.

  30. Don’t what it is about this time of year – the standards of driving have taken a nose-dive since the clocks went back – do so many people only drive when it’s light and dry? Pitiful – try doing 1200 miles a month – soon teaches you how to drive safely!

  31. one day we wil get into a car that will just drive for you,im sure merc are close but i hope not.Old cars are great you could be forgiven for thinking you were at the “controls” just the right amount of choke,feather the throttle etc etc now we drive cars and the steering might as well be rack and nurofen!

  32. I like rain sensors. I hate drizzly rain and the cars I have had with auto wipers have done it brilliantly. Auto lights on my C6 were useful, but only because they were HIDs and the car had DRLs – had it not had DRLs, I’d have hated having the lights on all the time (for other road user’s consideration) and hated having no lights on in equal measure.

  33. “,why we have autolights and rain sensing wipers is beyond me,are we that lazy or stupid that we need such a “convenience” feature?we all managed without them before.”

    Autolights have their uses, but they’re obviously not essential. My mums car has them, she has day running lights (basically dipped headlamps), it’s handy as it prevents you from accidentally latching full beam on during the day and activates the dash lights at dusk at which point it allows you to use full beam. Most cars i believe can have the trigger levels adjusted by the dealer.
    The auto wipers are handy as they vary the intermittent interval depending on the amount of rain, so with light drizzle they might do a single flick every so often.
    Obviously though any automated feature of a car can be handled manually, but where does one draw the line. I mean i’m sure drivers used to manage perfectly well with a manual advance and retard on the steering wheel or double de-clutching to change gear. Cars have constantly developed over the past century or so, we already have auto-brake and auto park features. Then there is that ‘road train’ thing where cars can follow a lead vehicle on the motorway, matching speed and direction. I think it’s quite likely there will come a time where cars actually drive them selves.

    “I am late 20s and have never driven a manual choke. I imagine the choke comes out to start, and gets pushed back in gradually as the engine heats up?”
    That’s basically it, but every car is different, and the amount of choke depends of the temperature. In summer you may not need to use it at all, in snow you might need all of it and some throttle too. Some cars warm up very quickly and once the car is started you can pretty much shove the choke straight back in. Quite different from modern twist and go, electronic injection.

    “try doing 1200 miles a month – soon teaches you how to drive safely!”
    Is that all? 12’000 is the current ‘average’, so that’s only a couple of K above average. Some of my former colleagues used to do 100’000 a year in a van doing local deliveries, to be honest not all of them were great drivers!

    “Old cars are great you could be forgiven for thinking you were at the “controls” just the right amount of choke,feather the throttle etc etc now we drive cars and the steering might as well be rack and nurofen!”
    That’s very true, my mini is great fun to drive for that very reason. Although for a long trip i’d much rather have an armchair to sit in, with cruise control, easy steering, near silent engine and insulating suspension. Noise, Bumps and pot holes get a bit boring after a few miles! I did 1200 miles in couple of days in my mini once, but i was shattered when i’d finished!

  34. When I learned to drive, it was in the Scottish Borders. I did between 30-50,000 miles a year – quite often 5,000 miles a month.

    Get me on a B-road or A-road with some bends and I’m happy. Put me on the A38 in Birmingham at rush hour I am possibly the most miserable person in the city.

  35. @ Francis Brett
    Hear Hear! You are right we did all manage without them before and we were better off without these gadgets because the lack of them made us think about what we were doing. Rather like speed cameras will repetitively churn out speeding fines, all a speeding motorist needs to do is slo down for them. In days gone by the sight of a white Senator or Rover 800 /SD1 or Granada with a wide red go faster stripe would also encourage holding the wheel with both hands and sitting up straight etc etc – and these were in the days before mobile phones… What I am trying to say is driving is something you do need to think about – modern cars make it all to convenient to think about lifes other distractions, like mobile phones, TV’s and MP3 players & iPods(whatever they are). In fact anything but driving! Believe it or not I am under 40

  36. And why have electric handbrakes?vag/audi have 28v rear calipers(aditional acu,driver req)opel renault etc etc the mk2 scenic had a box at the rear of the car with cables going to the calipers why the complication?more wieght etc even my 406 had r/s wipers and used to come on in bright,dry weather!some safety related stuff is ok but why anaesthetize our driving pleasure and experience with uncalled for nonsense? more switches and buttons = more distractions look our pure a mk1 fiesta,chevette or marina was compared to today is it what we want or is it what we need?

  37. @Francis
    And thats why last year I dumped off my 53 plate A3 for a 1979 Midget – yes its not got the chrome bumpers and not the ‘best’ midget but I love it – its simple motoring and puts a smile on my face, and certainly not anaesthetized unlike just about every normal car these days. When something goes wrong I can put it right too…

  38. “opel renault etc etc the mk2 scenic had a box at the rear of the car with cables going to the calipers why the complication?”
    In principle it’s a good idea, but legislation dictates parking brakes must have a mechanical linkage, hence we get these convoluted things with cables and motors. I delivered to a house a few months ago, as i walked past the neighbours drive a Ford Galaxy pulled out in front of me. Then i noticed there was no one in it. Even with manual handbrakes people forget to apply them!

    All these features are a double edged sword though, obviously if the driver has to make less inputs they will tired less quickly on the other hand the more systems there are on a car, the more there is to go wrong.
    Of course things like manual windows have less to go wrong than powered ones, but one touch electric windows are are lot easier to close than frantically trying to wind up manual ones when it’s suddenly starting pelting down.

    Being anaesthetized from the road depends on why you’re driving in the first place. If you’re going out for a drive for pleasure, because you enjoy driving then you want to feel connected to the road, be at one with the car. But on the other hand if you’re driving for a living and have to travel thousands of miles a month for work, you just want to get around as comfortably as possible and arrive at your destination feeling fresh and relaxed.

  39. @ Dennis
    I take your point re long distances – I did a 400 mile round trip this summer in the MG – I enjoyed it but would not want to do it everyday. What I am getting at is we need to remember we are controlling potentially lethal weapons so we should not be made to think we are in our front rooms and therefore relax like we do in our front rooms

  40. Yes, why DO we put the clocks back in autumn? If ONLY we kept BST all year round or synchronised with European Central Time, then this would alter the way the earth moves around the sun and give us unlimited daylight hours even in the depths of winter – it’s a WIN-WIN idea.

  41. “Yes, why DO we put the clocks back in autumn? If ONLY we kept BST all year round or synchronised with European Central Time”

    Trouble is in the southern UK this works well, but the further north you go the days get shorter. So Scotland would lose out, of course we could have a separate time zone for Scotland, but that would be even more confusing, these islands aren’t really big enough to warrant separate time zones with-in them. Makes me laugh though every year the government look at it, but as i understand it they trialled it for 3 years in the 70’s and it was shown to cause problems for the north and make little real difference in the south. Pretty much written off as a disaster, so if it didn’t work then, why would it now? But why keep BST rather than sticking at GMT which is our natural time zone. One argument we hear is that there would be less accidents in the evening, but surely we’d just have more in the morning instead?

    ” then this would alter the way the earth moves around the sun and give us unlimited daylight hours even in the depths of winter”
    I take it the bit about changing the way the earth moves was a joke?

  42. “I take it the bit about changing the way the earth moves was a joke.”

    Of course it was a joke (or would have been if it was funny).

    Your case against having BST in winter is exactly right. In my first post I just did not have the patience to explain it all as well as you did, so I thought a bit of heavy sarcasm might suffice (obviously I got that wrong!)

  43. Just last week I’m pootling along in a great big bloody double deck bus, with spangly LED indicators blinking away (not the most invisible of vehicles) as I was in the process of making a right hand turn. In fact I was beginning to make the turn just as the tw@ in a knackered old Vauxhall Combo/Corsa van thing decided it was his time to overtake… A bloody good blast from the air horn followed, thank goodness I keep a watchful eye on those mirrors.

    As for the clocks thing, dunno, but that extra hour on one Sunday a year is rather nice. 🙂

  44. “sarcasm might suffice”

    I thought it probably was, but sarcasm is difficult to do on the internet. 😉

    “Just last week I’m pootling along in a great big bloody double deck bus, with spangly LED indicators blinking away (not the most invisible of vehicles)”

    I used to drive for DHL, had a Bright Yellow Actros. 13ft high about 8ft wide, 36ft long and did i mention BRIGHT YELLOW. It wasn’t uncommon for people to just pull out in front of you on A-Roads. I think we also get bad driving in summer, during hot weather, i suspect people lack sleep and drive around the following day in a dozy state.

  45. “As for the clocks thing, dunno, but that extra hour on one Sunday a year is rather nice.”

    Ah, but you pay for it one other Sunday a year when they steal an hour from you!

  46. I’ve just come dangerously close to being dead thanks to a very silly bint in a chavved up Corsa who literally flew onto a roundabout in front of me (I was already on the roundabout)did not even get an apology or sheepish look.

    Maybe I should have just not shown my skiful driving and just slammed into the side of her and claimed for the lot?

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