Archive : Rover 75 – just the job

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

OXFORD MAIL
Just the job

THOUSANDS of new jobs will be created in Oxfordshire with the launch of Rover’s new Cowley-built executive car.

Around 1,000 will be taken on at Rover’s Cowley car plant with another 5,000 jobs being created among component suppliers – an estimated 2,500 of those in Oxfordshire.
The big new luxury car, codenamed the R40, will secure the future of the plant where production will more than double.

Rover expect to be producing more than 100,000 R40s a year, within a year of its launch in 1999. The car is expected to spearhead a drive to re-establish Rover as a major exporter of luxury cars to the USA. Its launch could also lead to a re-branding of the car plant as Rover Group Oxford, distancing the new car from previous lack-lustre models produced at Cowley such as the Maestro and Montego.

It is the first new Rover model to be totally designed and engineered in Britain for 25 years. Insiders say it will hark back to the best days of Rover’s heritage, with plenty of wood and leather trim matched by the latest technology.

It is also the first model to be produced entirely under the ownership of BMW, which has repeatedly said the car will have an in-built “Britishness”. The car, which is being built to BMW’s exacting quality standards, is designed to re-establish Rover among the world-class prestige luxury car makers, going head-to-head with Mercedes-Benz and Audi.

Rover Group chairman and chief executive Walter Hasselkus said: “This new vehicle is important to the continuation of this British success, so it has been decided that the British International Motor Show in October is the appropriate venue for the car’s show debut. “The R40 will represent the modern vision of Rover and the excellence of British design.”

BMW has pumped more than £250m into new assembly lines, paintshop and a vehicle preparation area for the production of the new car. Insiders say the executive car, which will blend styling drawn from the British car maker’s heritage with state-of-the-art engineering, is the best ever produced by Rover.

An insider said: “It is so beautiful. It’s drop dead gorgeous. When you see it, you’ll want to own it.” Rover’s managing director at Cowley , Doug Dickson , said production of the car has secured the plant’s future. He said: “We have invested £250m to effectively build a brand new factory within a factory. With the state-of-the-art facilities, and the skill and enthusiasm of our people, we are confident that we will deliver a truly world-class car.

“I am proud to be part of the design and manufacturing team delivering this important car.”

Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it up to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Classics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasible adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

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2 Comments

  1. They were so optimistic, it’s heart wrenching… BP should have shut the f**k up at the launch of the 75.

  2. Sad indeed. How things can so suddenly change!

    During the Honda years image and quality had been restored. There was sales success at a smaller, premium level anyway. When BMW came along, it seemed like the next step – a Rover producing its own designs from the ground up. It really was an optimistic time. Rover (BL) was now going to be a premium, quality producer. A strategy which Graham Day had started. So near and yet so far. I think really someone in government should have had some vision and stepped in to keep BMW at the helm. Instead they declined, seeing it as more state aid to keep the company propped up again. But this wasn’t the case this time. A final injection of state funds would have seen a successful Rover, division of BMW.

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