Video : Two More For the Road, Rover 2300/2600

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Keith Adams ponders one of his favourite BL videos, the lovely Two More For The Road, starring the late Anton Rodgers and a trio of launch-spec Rover SD1s in the South of France…


Two More For the Road

Thanks to the joys of the British Motor Industry Heritage Trust (BMIHT) and its range of retro-themed videos, we’re able to enjoy some of the stand-out cinematic moments from the best years of British Leyland. Here we’re able to bask in the delights of the newly-launched Rover 2300 and 2600 as our hero Anton Rodgers dashes about the South of France chasing down the pretty girl of his dreams.

Two more for the Road – Part One

Two more for the road – Part Two

Although the car is most definitely the star of this short film, you can’t help but admire the way Anton Rodgers comes across as a hapless romantic, who concocts a connection with the young girl he’s chasing because they’re driving the same type of car. These days, it would be regarded as stalking, of course, but back in 1977, when the world was a gentler place, it was all good harmless fun.

The real purpose of this short film was to show off the new additions to the Rover SD1 family. The six-cylinder SD1s were launched more than a year after the V8 original had gone on sale, and this was an opportunity to sell the range in a positive way again. So, the car was paraded around the South of France in the hills to the north of Nice (the mountainous roads in the La Madone D’Utelle area), shown on open roads, and looking magnificent in such a lovely setting.

Former BL press relations officer Ian Elliott recalls, ‘that film was shot by Rover Photographer Alan Luckett. He’d done hours of work on the continuity when David Bache decided to change the coachlines, and in theory a lot of the footage was strictly unusable. But I think they turned a blind eye.’

Sit back, enjoy the video and let us know what you think.

  • If you’d like the original, DVDs of this and many other adverts and promotional films are available from British Motor Industry Heritage Trust.
Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it up to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Classics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasible adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

15 Comments

  1. The word “embarrassing” comes to mind. Such behaviour would be qualified stalking nowadays, possibly even harassment, I’m afraid…

    • Zebo… your probably right but that’s how it was in the 70’s. However we have now gone to the other extreme of political correctness which is displayed in most facets of daily UK life. Again, I am probably showing my age!

  2. I quite like the second video of the old man with a broken down Volvo, being given a lift in the Rover 2600, and the point being laboured that the Volvo saloon didn’t have enough space for his carpet. Perhaps Rover were trying to portray their 2600 as a futuristic hatchback with a huge boot, compared with the staid Volvo with its smaller boot, but I can’t remember seeing many Volvo 200s breaking down in the late seventies and it would be more likely the Rover being broken down in France on a long journey. However, I will say Leyland really tried with this video and it has a certain period charm.

    • Yes, thank goodness for that lady in her reliable Rover SD1, helping out the poor old man in his *infamously breakdown-prone* Volvo 144!

      • If you were a company car man, with the budget to spend on a SD1 or a 144/244, in the 70’s, getting the company to agree to an estate car was often difficult.

        Estate cars weren’t in the mainstream and would have given off all the wrong messages to customers. Meanwhile, heavily unionised workforces, with delivery drivers employed directly by the company, used to object (loudly) to reps and managers being able to carry goods for themselves.

        Hatchbacks blurred the boundaries and were usually acceptable.

        It seems like madness now, but that’s how it used to be for a lot of company car users.

    • Glenn, this programme would have probably been shot on 16mm motion picture FILM, prior to the days of shooting on videotape / cassette. That’s my impression judging by the archive image quality.

      • Most likely, as British Leyland was desperate to sell its products, and a cheap VT would have looked out of place advertising a Rover.
        Also I remember those corporate adverts that appeared around the same time, advertising everything from a Mini to a Rover 3500, which must have cost a packet to make as they featured several actors and cars in different locations.

  3. Missing apostrophes, conveniently forgotten Volvo estates, a plot line which revolves around the SD1 driver behaving like a sexual predator. This one’s like shooting fish in a barrel.

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