News : New Nissan Note to be built in the UK

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Nissan Note

Nissan, the UK’s largest car manufacturer, has confirmed that its latest B-segment challenger, the new Note, will be built in the UK at its Sunderland factory in Washington. Like the Juke and Qashqai, the Note was engineered at Nissan Technical Centre Europe (NTCE) in Cranfield, UK.

A €147.5m investment has been made in Washington to further extend capacity and integrate Note assembly alongside the Juke production line. In addition to final assembly, NMUK is also producing axles, cylinder heads, camshafts and petrol engines for the new car. The introduction of Note production to Europe has created around 2000 new jobs at Nissan and throughout its UK supplier network.

The integration of Note production into what is one of the world’s most productive and efficient car plants further highlights Nissan’s engineering skills. To incorporate production and assembly of the Note’s new features, numerous changes have been made to the plant layout. Among these are a new sunroof glazing facility and a new Around View Monitor testing facility that allows production engineers to fully calibrate the Note’s innovative rear view camera.

The success story for Nissan’s European production base doesn’t end with the Note. Along with ongoing production of the Qashqai at NMUK, a new premium compact model under the Infiniti brand has also been confirmed.

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Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it up to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Classics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasible adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

16 Comments

  1. do we know when production starts? The new Note is already on sale, I think. I’m wondering whether they’re currently importing them, whereas the old model was being made here

  2. Production of four different models at Sunderland could never have been imagined back in 1986 when Nissan started assembling Bluebird’s. Huge success story for the North East which was better known as a shipbuilding / heavy engineering and coal mining area. How times change…

  3. Designed, engineered and manfacturered to a very high quality, in one of the most efficient car plants in the World, and it all happens in the UK!
    Well done Nissan!

  4. With the current Micra being a bit of a flop in Europe, the Note takes on greater significance as effectively Nissan’s mainstream supermini…

  5. Of the 100 or so cars I have owned I have never owned a Japanese one. I never will – my money, my choice.
    However – full and hearty congratulations to Nissan – well done for making an increasing range of cars in the UK. They sell – they provide jobs for lots of people, they pay tax (don’t want to know too much detail of how much or little) – they pay some.
    Nissan and a few others are proving that our workers can design and make good cars. Great news. Love it.
    Pity Rover management and workforce had not had Nissan’s work ethic a few years ago (whoops – did I say that out loud?)
    All history – well done Nissan and the UK – move on.

  6. It is a vote of confidence in Sunderland again and I reckon by the end of the decade this could be the biggest car factory in Europe as its productivity is among the best in the world, there hasn’t been a single day of industrial action in 27 years and they make good cars. While the French and the Italians limp on with unproductive plants, state subisdies and often unreliable products, Nissan UK had shown the way forward and ironically in a country which once had all the problems the French have now.

  7. Sorry, Maestrowoff they did not. The last Rover I had was a P4 80.
    The last BL car was a Marina but I’ve had loads of Sprites, Midgets and things of that era.

  8. Bought my wife a Juke for her birthday and she loves it! No problems either. I hope the mischief created by our politicians will not end up with closure of the factory along with the Honda and Toyota plants. Continental (Renault), Japanese, US and Indian investors have been tolerant of us so far, but the crude efforts to limit immigration and the threat to leave the EU pose a major threat to all car manufacturing in the UK. Sad that now we seem to have got our act together, our politicians are preparing to flush it all away.

  9. Robert
    I suspect the collapse of new car sales and massive financial problems in much of the Eurozone will be far more of a worry to car manufacturers than eutosceptic posturing by UK politicians…

  10. @9,What crude limits are you tripping? The indians and Japs tolerant so far? nonsense. We have a good workforce and the U.K is a better place to do Business. Portugals government has collapsed,France has a president as popular as a turd in a swimming pool and the ripper will be out before Greece is back in pocket. The EU will be the ruin of this country,the sooner we are out the better.None of the above would pull out,Nor would BMW,Audi or Merc stop selling us cars or anyone else for that matter.

  11. The problems are not with the EU either way becuase free trade agreements between UK and EU will continue after their renegotiation.

    The problem is the habitual short termism and the need to make quick megabucks which threatens to destabilise our position. This also applies to indigenous CEOs in this country hence the reason wjy I have said in the past thers are no good British CEOs

  12. Pennywise but pound foolish. The Germans have been so successful because of their long termist outlook. I fear that the money system will be so heavily manipulated again that interest rates may force manufacturers to move production to other more stable economies if it becomes too jumpy.

  13. Why do people still think German= total reliability and quality? Mercedes had a spell where their C class cars suffered from premature rust, the Mark 4 Golf was unreliable and I hear plenty of tales about faults on BMWs. Yes Volkswagen and Audi have got their quality back after a few poor years in the noughties, but BMW’s and small Mercs aren’t all they’re supposed to be and cost a fortune to service and fix.
    Best car I’ve driven recently was a Hyundai I 30 CRDI. This had Germanic quality of finish, a lot better than the cheap grey plastic on the Getz I owned 7 years ago, was extremely quiet at speed and good to drive with excellent handling and a willing engine.

  14. This country is full of great ideas and we have a natural knack for invention, what we haven’t been so good at in recent years is converting this aptitude into manufacturing on a large scale. Short term-ism is partly to blame in my view too but the bright side is our great trading relationship with the Japanese which has taught us to manufacture well and efficiently. As good as, if not better than Germany now. Well done to the guys in Sunderland and Nissan generally. All we need to do now is rid ourselves of the self serving culture that many of our top directors have , making a fast buck to the detriment of the country. This is the only advantage Germany has over us going forward. They have always thought long term and protected their heavy industry.
    The Germans concentrate on European issues negotiate,get the best deal they can then look to the rest of the world were they can trade. Europe is theirs and our trading anchor.
    All we do is talk to each other about Europe on how good and bad it is, we are trapped in a loop.
    If Britain were a company we wouldn’t say to our biggest client “get stuffed” even if they were a pain.
    Use Europe and sell to the rest of the world. We need to stop being so insular on this issue.

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