Geneva Motor Show 2013 : Chamber of horrors

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Keith Adams

Hamann tuned Range Rover L405. There's no accounting for taste.
Hamann tuned Range Rover L405. There’s no accounting for taste.

Every year, without fail, Geneva serves up some of the wildest and most amazing concepts and prototypes. They’re built by a range of companies – from the largest multi-national, through the smallest supercar manufacturer to the tuners and design houses of the world.

In the old days, the most ‘extreme’ were housed in what became known as the ‘hall of shame’ but, in recent years – no doubt at the behest of tuners across Europe – they have been dispersed among the major manufacturers across the halls. And that’s made ugly shooting just a little bit more difficult.

Be that as it may, perseverance pays off, as our chamber of horrors gallery painfully spells out.

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Hamann Spyridon
Lamborghini Venemo
Lamborghini Veneno
Sbarro Jaclyn, based on the Jaguar XK
Sbarro Jaclyn, based on the Jaguar XK
Sbarro Jaclyn based on the Jaguar XK.
Sbarro Jaclyn based on the Jaguar XK.
Mansory F12 Berlinetta
Mansory F12 Berlinetta
Mitsubishi GR-HEV
Mitsubishi GR-HEV
Startech Series 3.1
Startech Series 3.1
Weismann MF4-CS
Weismann MF4-CS
Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it up to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Classics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasible adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

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12 Comments

  1. (whispers) I like a lot of these…

    The Lamborghini Veneno looks mad, like a real-life Batmobile and will be a limited production run.

    The Mitsubishi looks like a preview of the next L200, which seems to sell well.

    I like the retro style of the Startech, it could be the thing to keep Defender sales up, like the last of the Minis playing the retro card.

    The harmann SUV things though are just Vulgar, and the jury is out on the Wiessman. Looks like a cross between a TVR and a Morgan, though if I saw one on the road I’d probably give it a good look.

  2. I actually like the Weismann. Possibly not in bright orange. British racing green would suit the styling, if not the name. Then again, Daimler was accepted as an English car, so there you go.

  3. I don’t have a problem with the Defender at all, the front end should NEVER have been changed in the first place (err.. is that GLUED on??)

    And I LIKE the exterior of the Weismann – although I agree, she would look better in British Racing Green — or AC Cobra purple (genuine classic quote from the 60’s motoring press: “When the purple bit hits the green bit, who’s going to match the paint?”)

  4. The Landrover doesnt look that bad. In fact if someone had said this was a factory facelift I wouldnt have been surprised.

  5. Oh dear God- NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!

    Please tell be that only the excessively wealthy are likely to contract such a socially disfiguring disease as a Lamborghini Venerial…

  6. The Landy with the old style grille looks plainly stupid. It sticks out too far. Remember S3’s had recessed grilles.

  7. The Startech Land Rover Series 3 grille got the thumbs-up from me – a nicely executed conversion.

    Mitsubishi’s Space Star (nee Mirage) was being promited as a “Mini-MPV”, which it’s patently not. It’s the sort of lowest common denominator supermini Hyundai and Kia were flogging ten years ago. Unless they’re planning on selling it for £6K, the buying public will walk away. Why, then did they populate half their stand with about a dozen of the miserable little things?

    Then there’s Jeep. Decent enough cars (Compass possibly excepted), fine girls, but about three-quarters of the stand was empty floorspace. Was there some sort of “Wide Open Spaces” theme going on?

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