News : ‘Green’ scrappage still claiming classics

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Keith Adams

There's thought to be only three Chrysler Horizons like this left in the UK. And yet, it's been scrapped under government-backed environmental initiatives.
There’s thought to be only three Chrysler Horizons like this left in the UK. And yet, it’s been scrapped under government-backed environmental initiatives.

A ‘green’ company set-up to recycle old cars under the End of Life Vehicle (ELV) Directive has been responsible for destroying perfectly serviceable cars, such as this lightly-used and mint-condition Chrysler Horizon. The car was worth £140 to its owner who asked the company Autogreen to recycle the car. It was sent for scrap, and a Certificate of Destruction (COD) issued against it, meaning that this Horizon will never be used on the road again.

But these pictures of the before-and-after pictures of the 59,000-mile 1979 Chrysler Horizon by Adrian Brannan and shown on the RetroRides forum show a car that was in superb condition and in good enough condition to service its owner for years to come. AROnline‘s stance on environmental motoring advocates the ethical use of well-cared for old cars over a longer period of time – and this Horizon could have been a perfect example of environmentally sound motoring. In short, driving this Horizon and servicing it thoroughly yourself might have been one of the greenest actions you could take.

Currently, the UK recognises ‘historic’ cars by one single means – the pre-1973 VED exemption – so this car is not seen as a ‘classic’  in the eyes of the government. But if the UK followed the European practice of there being a 25-35 year rolling recognition of historic status – as well as passing an optional condition/use inspection to qualify – then the destruction of cars such as this might not so easy on the ‘environmental’ ticket alone.

Adrian Brannan, who owns a Horizon similar to this, said: ‘Basically an agent that gives out a little less than weigh-in price. They then get a local scrappy to go get it, and they receive a small percentage more. So this company probably made something like a £20 broker’s fee, and the scrappy a bit more selling parts from it… but still the car has to die a quite unjust death, all in the name of small convenient profits. Autogreen? Yeah right..’

A spokesperson for Autogreen said: ‘In response to the above we would like to point out that the last owner in this instance was under no obligation to proceed based on our quotation offered, and was free to sell the vehicle. Our website is quite clear that we handle “scrap vehicles” for treatment and destruction by the issuing of a DVLA Certificate of Destruction.

‘No doubt if he was able to achieve a higher price from sale he would of taken that option. If the car, as someone suggests was worth £1300, surely an owner would exercise this option rather than scrap the vehicle. When you consider that the owner had an obvious interest in this type of vehicle, it would be assumed that he knew the approximate value, if indeed it was worth that amount. Maybe there was another underlying reason as to why the owner wanted the vehicle destroyed, that no one has taken into consideration when pointing the finger of blame.

‘It is interesting to note that despite the outcries from the writer of the article, this website seems to still be interested in taking a profit from the selling of advertising space to companies offering a similar service to ours adjacent to this article.

‘The name Autogreen is derived from the provision of service and environmentally friendly methods in which cars are disposed in line with European Legislation when deemed as End of Life. If a customer decides that he considers his vehicle is classified as scrap, and end of life in his eyes, which is not concurrent with the opinions of others here, then that is a decision that is outside of our control.

‘It should be noted that during the scrappage scheme Autogreen, actively saved a Riley classic from such fate and the vehicle has been restored and given a new lease of life. Therefore, this demonstrates we are not just interested in the scrap, but we do have to respect the wishes of the last owner who instructs us.

‘If the Publishers of this website wishes to send to myself a definitive list of vehicles which it considers to be classic’s, we can then be informed and advise the last owner that their may be a more beneficial route for their vehicle. Classic car forums such as this, should engage with companies such as ourselves, rather than immediately call into question our actions, so that a trigger point for such vehicles can be put in place and last owner better informed of their options.’

And that’s the issue – whatever your thoughts are about the Horizon, its destruction is not green practice at all, but simply a case of short-term profiteering. And this madness really needs to stop…

Keith Adams

Keith Adams

Editor and creator AROnline at AROnline
Created www.austin-rover.co.uk in 2001 and built it up to become the world's foremost reference source for all things BMC, Leyland and Rover Group, before renaming it AROnline in 2007.

Is the Editor of the Parkers website and price guide, formerly editor of Classic Car Weekly, and launch editor/creator of Modern Classics magazine. Has contributed to various motoring titles including Octane, Practical Classics, Evo, Honest John, CAR magazine, Autocar, Pistonheads, Diesel Car, Practical Performance Car, Performance French Car, Car Mechanics, Jaguar World Monthly, MG Enthusiast, Modern MINI, Practical Classics, Fifth Gear Website, Radio 4, and the the Motoring Independent...

Likes 'conditionally challenged' motors and taking them on unfeasible adventures all across Europe.
Keith Adams

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59 Comments

  1. Well that’s spoilt my day. Why for god’s sake? It looks like the owner loved this car so why was it scrapped?
    I dispair sometimes.

  2. If the roads were littered with Talbot Horizons (which would probably sound as if the area was infested by giant sexually aroused grasshoppers) then the loss of one, especially in such a hideous colour would not be any loss.

    I can’t believe I used the phrase ‘sexually aroused’ in the same sentence as ‘Talbot Horizon’, nevertheless, when they become as rare as this and in such good condition it would be a bloody shame to lose it.

    If I had a car of such rarity I would be making money on it by hiring it out to TV and film companies for use as street furniture or possibly having it star as the heroes car in a retro Sweeney or Life on Mars type show driven by Jude Law or Christian Bale…

    Sorry, got over-aroused there again. Must go and take a cold shower.

  3. The scrappage scheme was ridiculous, only really helped the likes of Kia, I could see no reason why the cars handed in could not be resold, as Keith says so much better to keep an older car running after all the energy went into building it! Very sad to see the pointless end of good vehicles 🙁

  4. This isn’t even scrappage. This is AutoGreen under the guise of “Rewarding Recycling” and similar to “Car Take Back”, and is a much crappier thing than scrappage.

    Scrappage stimulated money moving around the economy and new car sales & finance deals at a time when it needed a severe kick and gave the owners a good incentive. Green or not, it was at least a poke for the economy somewhere.

    This… this is just moronic, taking advantage of stupid people. Like those schemes that “buy” your CDs or mobile phones, it’s an online referral for local scrapyards, with no rewards or anything of note for the consumer, just a cheque for less than you’d have got selling the thing for parts or direct to a scrapyard. But the Certificate of Destruction is part of it, and I suspect those CoDs are exchanged for further incentives, carbon credits or whatever by the firms doing it. There’ll be a subsidy somewhere funding the TV advertising.

    I’m an advocate of bombing their Twitter and other presences with negative PR, frankly.

  5. @4, Richard Kilpatrick,

    I agree with your comments re the original scrappage scheme- it was a shame to see so many good cars being scrapped but at least it stimulated the economy- people mock the last Government as being fiscally irresponsible (and I was not a supporter of them) but at least they were prepared to do something to get the economy working.At the risk of getting political, and speaking as someone who is out of work, they did a damn sight more than merely pillorying benefits claimants whilst giving tax breaks to millionaires and refusing to sanction the Mansion Tax on the grounds that their owners have worked hard all their lives for them (as if care workers, bus drivers, bin men, etc hadn’t worked hard enough…). Incidentally, in one of the most expensive streets in London, almost all of the houses are owned by offshore companies, so their ‘owners’ didn’t pay any tax on them…

    Rant over.

  6. Something isn’t right here. If the owner brought it to shows surely they would know it’s worth more than £140?

  7. The scrappage scheme was created for political and economic reasons. Everyone with half a brain realised this and it made me wonder why it was decided that the populace needed to be lied to by making out environmentalism had anything to do with it.
    I run a 1998 Nissan Primera which I service myself. Now if I where to scrap this car and buy a brand new car that offered a lower fuel consumption, would the reduction in carbon dioxide that I now emitted as popped down the supermarket be worth it environmentally? Of course not. We all know that maintaining a car that already exists is far ‘greener’ than producing a new one.

    The owner of this car must have been brain damaged. I would have given them twice that for it straight away and given it to my partner to use, thus stopping her from buying a brand new car which she plans to. Now that is green! (like the Talbot) .

  8. I think this highlights why the whole definition of ‘historic vehicle’ is so completely out of touch with more recent classics. Judging a car to be ‘historic’ simply by the 1973 VED status is fundamentally flawed and will ultimately see many rare cars such as this Talbot Horizon from the late 1970s and into the early 1980s not receiving any encouragement to be saved.

    It really is time the whole ‘historic vehicle’ definition was reviewed so that it can embrace vehicles built after 1973. After all, when was the last time you saw a Talbot Samba, Talbot Tagora, Datsun 120Y or Fiat 132 Mirrafiori?

  9. @10, Alan,

    I’d imagine that giving your partner a 1979 Talbot Horizon as a present probably would not have improved your standing in that relationship, unless she likes the sound of cans of dried beans being kicked down the stairs… She’d also need to have biceps like Popeye to master the heavy steering, so a few tins of spinach would be handy!

    @David3500

    I doubt that the pre-1973 historic vehicle designation has had any effect on the survival rate of any of the cars you mention- given that all of them disolved faster than an Alka Seltzer tablet in a glass of Perrier…

    Shame, a Fiat Mirafiori would have made an interesting classic these days- especially for its wonderful twin cam engine. Unfortunately Morris Minor owners seem to snaffle them for conversions.

  10. I’m trying to understand why the organisation behind this are seen as the bad guys. Surely its the owner of cars like this Horizon who have decided to throw it away that are to blame here? All this green recycling lot are offering to do is help people dispose of life expired vehicles easily without having to deal with scrap yards direct. Something most “normal” people would probably struggle with. Most of the vehicles that pass through this company will be properly life expired and not simply old like this Horizon. Same with scrappage. I doubt the government imagined that people would be insane enough to use it to swap classic MG’s for a Kia, but they where. Thats nobodys fault except the person who did it!

  11. Bit strange this, so the owner decided that their car was worth £140 and then wanted to scrap it. Showing it one week scrapping it the next. I suppose it’s their car and they can do what they want with it. Perhaps they had tried selling it and got no interest. The only way to make sure a rare car does not get rarer is to buy it when you see one advertised, then you can make sure it’s preserved. It’s not as though Autogreen came round and nicked it, or gave the owner a big inducement.
    I suppose it would be the same as the owners of the Mk1 Consul or Farina also in the picture suddenly deciding they wanted to take up pre ’68 banger racing. Who can stop them.

  12. The scrappage scheme was not mandatory… if people wanted to get rid of an old piece of metal that is their decision to make, why is there so much fuss made over someone elses free will I do not know. I agree that it is a shame that so many roadworthy cars went to the crusher but that was the owners choice, not a compulsory purchase order from Whitehall!!

  13. Crikey! I saw this very car at a classic show at Stirling earlier in the summer, and spent a good 20 minutes poring over every detail of it. I loved the colour, and couldn’t find a single rust spot or blemish on the whole car. I was hoping to find the owner to congratulate them on keeping such a rare car in such fine condition – but if I’d known for a second they were planning to scrap it, I would have bought it there and then! That’s a crying shame, it was factory fresh, in absolutely stunning condition. What a pity…

  14. Truly horrendous action by the owner apart from the gross issues with the scrappage scheme. There’s a thriving club – The Simca Talbot Owner’s Club – plus ebay where a car like this would have found a new home. The Germans and the French seem to do a lot better in officially recognising morre recent vehicles as “youngtimers”. Hoipefully that trend will influence matters here.

    Very sad tale.

    Ian
    (owner of three Talbot Horizons – all Talbots!)

  15. @ Rob H. “I suppose it would be the same as the owners of the Mk1 Consul or Farina also in the picture suddenly deciding they wanted to take up pre ’68 banger racing. Who can stop them.”

    I can. With a swift kick in the stomach.

  16. Really deplorable. Keeping an old car going is the green option, whether it’s a classic or not. The fact that this was one of the last decent Horizons in the UK only makes it worse. I don’t understand the point of a CoD – surely there should have been some way of putting it back on the road.

  17. Reading the article makes me sad and, as someone has mentioned already, confused.

    You can understand people perhaps getting rid of wrecks, but this is clearly a cherished car in what appears to be excellent condition.

    It’s obviously up to the owner to decide what they do with their property, but it would be interesting to know the background on individual cases like this.

    It’s not like there’s even a financial incentive – you would think that a car like this would make a great starter classic easily worth a few hundred pounds, and the owner would be connected enough to sell it on.

    Shame.

  18. The compa ny that purchased this car has a website:

    http://www.rewardingrecycling.co.uk

    Thought OI’d obtain a price on one of mine. £93.60 Didn’t bite their hand off. From the information on the Retro Rides site, I got the impression that it was a one-owner car and then two in short succession. Maybe the original owner passed it on to family or friends and then they scrapped it for whatever reason.

    I think that all the clubs that cater for the more recent vehicles need to spread the word about what they are doing to persuade their members and other owners that there is an obvious route for disposal through the clubs where a good home would be more likely. Well done to Keith Adams for highlighting this particular vehicle and this issue in general. Hopefully he and his colleagues in the historic vehicle press can take this further. It’s got all the ingredients for a worthwhile TV feature or two.

  19. On the League Table of Idiocy, it’s difficult to place the various actors in order. I’d give 1st place to the owner of the car, who clearly couldn’t give a damn about it and would rather get £140 to destroy it than treble that amount for it to go to a good home. The kind of useful idiot who’d pay £3 for a useless CFL lightbulb “‘cos it’s green, innit?”

    A close 2nd place goes to the whole system, for the reasons Keith describes.

    3rd place goes to AutoGreen, who are just another low-grade motor trade parasite, taking their cut for doing the Government’s bidding.

    Has the car actually been destroyed? Surely a quiet word in the right ear and an… er… ‘incentive’ would save it. We are, after all, talking about the DVLA – Swansea’s own job creation scheme, who consistently refuse to admit how many vehicles in the UK are registered in the name of Mr. Michael Mouse.

    Depressing, all the same.

  20. The only advantage of the previous government’s scrappage scheme was to kick start the Korean motor industries recovery (how much steel do they buy from Redcar ??) schemes in Europe were more successful because in France and Germany they bought product from thier own factories not imported vehicles that just add more deficit to the counry’s balance of payments for a very marginal payment of VAT to the exchequer !! One can critise the MG set up in the UK but they do employ UK workers in their set up in Longbridge.
    The green argument does not hold water the amount of energy and pollution that is used and created to build a new car would take many,many years to show any positve results compared to a vehicle that is already been built the only pollution from that vehicle during whats left of it’s life now is from it’s exhaust which would be about the same as the pollution from the proportion of ship’s diesel engine used in bring a new car from abroad.

  21. I agree this is a great shame scrapping such a superb example of what is still, to many like myself an interesting car that we remember well.

    I have a belief that the current obsession of producing huge quantities of new vehicles at the expense of disposing of perfectly useable older cars like this is mad. I love seeing photos of 1950’s – 80’s cars at Classic Car shows. Sadly this Horizon will not be one of them. I’m surprised the owner couldnt get a keen enthusist buyer!

  22. it must be the owners fault it got scrapped surely? he gave it to them!! still a shame though, a taste of things to come…

  23. “The only advantage of the previous government’s scrappage scheme was to kick start the Korean motor industries recovery”

    And to support the UK financial services and retail industry.

    A lot more than Korean metal was shifted. MINIs and LandRovers, for example…

    ant80 @ 25 and others:

    Yes. The owner’s decision to sell the car for a pittance is their own decision, quite right. But I seriously doubt scrapping it, rendering it unusable, was their goal, I suspect they didn’t think it had a value and wanted the paltry sum offered. Maybe shenanigans are involved. Who knows.

    Either way, the fault lies with the “green” company that can’t distinguish between the exceptional environmental qualities of a perfectly functional and well maintained existing vehicle over and above the creation of a new vehicle, and slavishly issues a certificate of destruction for a car whether it is serviceable or not.

  24. I too seen this car at Glamis and Perth Classic Car shows, What a waste of a fantastic motor.

    The Strathmore Vintage Vehicle Club in Glamis are having an auction soon and this would easily make more than £140.

    Just a quick thing the Stout Brothers Garage in Forfar where my brother worked has been pulled down to make way for an Aldi supermarket.

  25. Agree that the scappage scheme had nothing to do with cars!! I’ve got a friend that worked at a VW Dealer, during the scrappage deal they had a lot of useful metal come through their doors like 8-10 year old Polos, Golfs as owners swapped them for brand new Fox’s and Polos!!!

    Even though all these cars were completely serviceable as soon as they were traded in as part of the scrappage scheme they could not be touched, sold on etc.. They had to be taken away by the contractor and crushed!!

    But that didn’t stop most of the mechanics “swapping” parts!! EG. One of the mechanics owned an Audi A3, so as soon as a similar one was traded in that had better alloys and a few other bits, what happened….get it on the ramp, pull it apart and replace with inferior parts; a long as it could be rolled onto the car transporter…
    Also my mate’s niece had a 97 Polo that was a bit of a mess, so it was “rebuilt” using parts from several similar model (and newer) Polos that has been traded in! It was borderline farce!!

  26. I’m sick of these Government backed “PC” scams.
    “Carbon footprint”,”Enviro”,”Save the planet”
    Utter Bullshit..

  27. I do wonder if the long term owner of this car had died, and it was then passed on, either to the grandchild who found the steering and rattle too much to live with and just thought it was a worthless old car, or the children of the original owner who found it upsetting to see it, you would think they would feel the opposite but it happend, I have seen a very nice SD1 VDP EFi go to the metal recylers for exactly this reason, and an Ital 2.0 HLS go to a scrap yard due to no other reason than the house was being cleared for sale after the owner had died

  28. There was a story a few years back, of a Mint condition, fully restored SD1 Vitesse in a breakers yard in London.

    The original owner had sent it to the yard, as he was forced to give up driving, with the strict instructions that it was to be crushed as it was. The attitude was “If I can’t drive it – no one else can now” Disgusting really. At least the yard owner did sell some parts off of it.

  29. A counterpoint to the anger and sad stories above: the father of a friend left a low mileage 8-year-old Rover 416 saloon behind when he passed away. The car needed repairs; but after fixing, it was sold for £1800 to a chap about 25 years old; when contacted about some paperwork a year later, he was still delighted with the car. To quote the parrot: “that’s the way to do it”.

  30. It’s a Talbot Horizon. The world is not a poorer place for its passing. Old does not mean classic. Sorry to be out of step with you all.

  31. I think you need to separete the righteously indignant from the rational. This is about a fast and easy way for people to dispose of scrap cars without havingto deal with scrap dealers. And yes, people do that – for every ARonliner there are thousands of people who don’t care for their old cars, whatever they are.
    Also the EU End Of Life directive is nothing new. I could go on, but you can find more on the web

    http://ec.europa.eu/environment/waste/elv_index.htm
    http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/business/regulation/31887.aspx

    The end of that Horizon is a shame, but ultimately it’s up to the owner what they do with it.

  32. I don’t understand how anyone who owned this car (and had taken it to car shows, as the picture above suggests) could have been unaware of its rarety and real worth.
    The fault is not really with the company here, it’s with the moron who gave it to them.

  33. It always warms my heart to see “cars that I grew up with” still in good shape, and it’s a shame to see such a well kept early model car like this one get scrapped.

  34. Yes the Horizon may or may not be a “classic” but, irrespective, to deliberately destroy a car in such condition in the name of “the environment” is insane!!! Unfortunately the best way to care for the environment is to stop producing so many new cars but I suppose thats a bit “off message” in these times of high unemployment.

  35. Too many comments on here that are very negative to the owner of that car (moron, brain damaged etc). You do not know why it was scrapped – could be mechanical, could be the owner passed away, could could be any number of reasons.
    Live and let live.

  36. About three years ago i was at a breakers yard of a dear friend whom had a contract with Pentagon Vauxhall for car disposals,in the yard was a completely immaculate C reg fiesta firefly with some 26k on the clock,garaged for years and traded in against a Matiz i was led to believe,i tried everything to secure purchase of the car even overmatching the scrap price tenfold- the only way i could get it was stripped with the V.I.N chiselled out,it really pissed me off,i didnt buy it because there would be no provenance to the car purchasing it that way.The couple whom disposed of it had the car since his grandad died some years earlier-it defied logic- here was a car that no matter what would still be worth far more than the washing machine of a car they bought in three years time,but that was thier decision.

  37. Do you mean Fiesta Fly? Back in ’92 I had a White Y reg Mk1 XR2 Fly. At the time I had no idea at all how rare it was, just thought it was unusuall, looked like a golf when the roof was up!. I repalced it with a 1500HL dolomite after getting fed up with leaks and the local low lifes not being able to leave it alone

  38. @42 It was a firefly special edition sunroof wheel trims etc,I had a supersport that was mint with a knocking engine i sold it because the bird was moaning about 9 years ago,now the prices are through the roof and i have never got over it!

  39. I personally can’t see a Marina or an Ital as a “classic”, however, it would be a shame if perfectly good versions were trashed for the sake of £150. The Horizon was a crappy car and one of the worst of a bad decade of cars, but it is surely worth saving just because of (a) rarity value and (b) as a reliec of a motoring era we will never see the likes of again – especially in that condition!

    The scrappage scheme is a great big con trick and resulted in very few sales of “British” cars – and by that I mean British made. In return we lost many interesting classic cars which, as a minimum, could have offered donor parts to keep others running.

    TBH, I’d rather have saved the Horizon than see yet another basket case MGB rescued. (Heresy!!!!)

  40. When the owner bought this car new from Stout Brothers in 1979 he must have been thrilled with it… I assume. Love reading what the charges were for plates, petrol & delivery back then. I bought my first new Datsun in ’79 and still have the invoice (£2900). Bring back those happy times!

  41. When we are governed by non-driving tree-hugging eco-facist half-wits; what do you expect?

    That the Horizon is a “classic” could be debated till the cows come home. That a perfectly useable, if elderly, well maintained vehicle is scrapped to meet some arificial “green” target is just cretinous. Was the owner lazy or competely brain dead? Surely an ad in Classic car Weekly would have had buyers offering at least 3 times the £140 paid out by the “recyclers”

  42. I wrote to the previous two Transport Ministers about this topic as well as the ridiculous waste of tax payer money trying to stop people undertaking when, as I suggested, re-introducing the sign ‘keep left unless overtaking’ would have been a far better way to spend and reduce motorway congestion. It would, one would hope, ram home the message to air headed drivers who think it is their god given right to lane hog when there is nothing on the inside lanes. Makes my blood boil that does. Back on topic.. I got polite replies on both subjects essentially saying it is not our priority ‘at this time’ . I am off to vote UKIP in the next election as a result and I really don’t care if people say its a wasted vote. Oh, and I have since sold all 3 cars and now let the train take the strain. Its like having a new lease of life even if I do kinda miss the MGZT-T 260 beast.

  43. Scrappage schemes were/are not ‘good for the economy’ – the represent an extremely short sighted measure to keep a basically unviable, capital intensive, low-to-no-margin industry afloat to the detriment of profitable, labour intensive, aftermarket services.

    Years after this foolishness founded by all of us, the car industry *still* puts out millions of new cars that no one ordered or particularly wants. It’s like the old EU practices of subsidising farmers to grow big and produced tons of stuff that lies rotting in warehouses.

    I mean, who’d you rather have as a friendly neighbour, a car mechanic or a car salesman (sorry Mike ;o) )?

  44. Also saw this car myself at Glamis this year. Looked mint (no pun intended). According to Practical Classics, a concours-class Horizon is worth £1300 at the moment…

  45. On a lighter note, a visit to my local Halfords (Derby Wyvern)(other car parts shops are available) for a new battery for my 75 Tourer the other day, led to a delightful smile when I saw a brown Talbot Horizon outside (on a T plate i think?) looking in mint condition, and obviously cherished. If it was one of the so called ‘3’ still on the roads, it was indeed rarer than hens teeth!

    The destruction of the mint-green example is indeed a crime.

  46. @39 Luke – Read the rest of the posts. The Government didnt come round in the night and hold a gun to the owners head to make him scrap his Horizon. It was his decision! Surely its better that a scheme exists to recycle vehicles that really are life expired than have them dumped at the roadside. Thats what used to happen!

  47. In response to the above we would like to point out that the last owner in this instance was under no obligation to proceed based on our quotation offered, and was free to sell the vehicle. Our website is quite clear that we handle “scrap vehicles” for treatment and destruction by the issuing of a DVLA Certificate of Destruction.

    No doubt if he was able to achieve a higher price from sale he would of taken that option. If the car, as someone suggests was worth £1300, surely an owner would exercise this option rather than scrap the vehicle. When you consider that the owner had an obvious interest in this type of vehicle, it would be assumed that he knew the approximate value, if indeed it was worth that amount. Maybe there was another underlying reason as to why the owner wanted the vehicle destroyed, that no one has taken into consideration when pointing the finger of blame.

    It is interesting to note that despite the outcries from the writer of the article, this website seems to still be interested in taking a profit from the selling of advertising space to companies offering a similar service to ours adjacent to this article.

    The name Autogreen is derived from the provision of service and environmentally friendly methods in which cars are disposed in line with European Legislation when deemed as End of Life. If a customer decides that he considers his vehicle is classified as scrap, and end of life in his eyes, which is not concurrent with the opinions of others here, then that is a decision that is outside of our control.

    It should be noted that during the scrappage scheme Autogreen, actively saved a Riley classic from such fate and the vehicle has been restored and given a new lease of life. Therefore, this demonstrates we are not just interested in the scrap, but we do have to respect the wishes of the last owner who instructs us.

    If the Publishers of this website wishes to send to myself a definitive list of vehicles which it considers to be classic’s, we can then be informed and advise the last owner that their may be a more beneficial route for their vehicle.

    Classic car forums such as this, should engage with companies such as ourselves, rather than immediately call into question our actions, so that a trigger point for such vehicles can be put in place and last owner better informed of their options.

  48. Thanks for getting in touch. And in the interests of fairness, I’ll add your comments to the main article.

    You’re right on the advertising situation with ‘scrap for cars’ placements. I will get the removed.

    A definitive classic list – the best way is to use the Practical Classics magazine price guide, updated every month.

    Regards,
    Keith

  49. Like other it mad to scrap the car if it was in such good condition.

    For fairness I look at what was offered for a 2004 Ford Mondeo, should get a few quid but the offer was £186, yes you read it right £186 that not a fair offer.

    I know with breaking the car myself I can pull back more in parts alone but this is not for breaking yet.

  50. @Paul,

    I’m not scrapping, but I’ve brought a car off ebay 2005 mondeo for £50, but it was too far gone to repair, but made over £500 in parts alone before scraping the shell.

  51. These articles always seem to get classic owners blood boiling, yet if this car was up for sale it simply wouldn’t get much response or be plagued with timewasters – ie buyers that don’t turn up.

    I like the fact that Autogreen have taken the time to comment and they are right in that it was the owners decision to condemn this vehicle.

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