News : Jaguar’s new XE to be better-connected by far…

Carole Nash Classic Insurance Specialists

Jaguar XE - Beneath the Skin Part 3

Jaguar has today issued the third in a series of four technology previews to be released during the launch of the all-new Jaguar XE and claims that the much-awaited new model “will deliver a smooth, supple ride, exceptionally sharp steering, quiet, luxurious cabin and seamless connectivity’ whilst being ‘equipped with a wide range of state-of-the art technologies designed to make every journey an even more enjoyable experience.”

The new XE’s InControl infotainment system is designed around an 8-inch touchscreen. A clear, intuitive user interface gives quick, easy access to all features and functions, and voice control using plain speech means that drivers can keep their eyes on the road at all times. Dr Mike Bell, Jaguar’s Global Connected Car Director, commented: “In-car technologies in this ever-more connected and fast-paced world are an integral part of your driving experience. With the all-new XE we’re introducing an entire suite of cutting-edge driver aids and entertainment systems. Designed and developed from scratch, they will ensure that every journey you take is simpler, more relaxing, safer, and effortlessly enjoyable.”

Smartphones are changing the way people interact with the world around them – the new XE ensures that drivers stay connected. Jaguar InControl Remote allows users of iOS and Android smartphones to connect to the car from wherever they are and control a range of vehicle functions. These include seven-day timed pre-setting of the XE’s climate control system, locking or unlocking the doors, or starting the engine.

Jaguar InControl Apps allows users to seamlessly access smartphone apps through the vehicle’s touchscreen, making it easy to do everything from make a conference call, find a parking space or book a hotel room. The XE also functions as a Wi-Fi hotspot, enabling multiple devices to connect to the internet – the vehicle antenna provides the best possible signal.

The sophistication of the infotainment system is matched by the array of advanced driver assistance systems available in the new XE: the laser head-up display (HUD) is an industry-first. Projecting sharp, high-contrast colour images onto the windscreen, the technology provides the driver with information such as speed and navigation instructions with maximum clarity and minimum distraction. As well as better image quality, the laser HUD is smaller and almost a third lighter than existing systems.

Designed and engineered in the UK, the aluminium-intensive XE will be the first Jaguar manufactured at a new purpose-built production facility at the company’s Solihull plant in the West Midlands in the UK.

The world premiere of the new Jaguar XE will be held in London on 8th September but, in the meantime, AROnline readers can watch Jaguar’s latest, pre-launch video entitled The New Jaguar XE: Better connected by far below.

Clive Goldthorp

Clive claims that his interest in the BMC>MG story dates back to his childhood in the 1960s when the family’s garage premises were leased to a tenant with an Austin agency. However, back in the 1920s and 1930s, his grandmother was one of the country’s first female Garage Proprietors so cars probably run in his genes! Admits to affairs with Alfa Romeos, but has more recently owned an 06/06 MG TF 135 and then a 15/64 MG3 Style… Clive, who was AROnline’s News Editor for nearly four years, stood down from that role in order to devote more time to various Motor Racing projects but still contributes articles on as regular basis as his other commitments permit.

11 Comments

  1. Is this all standard or will it end up being part of a £3K “Technology Pack”? – The way the Germans approach this sort of thing. Most BMW/Audi buyers seem to spec these as options. If Jaguar could make it all standard it would be a real usp for the XE.

  2. More interesting than the electronic accessories which, at the end of the day, all the big car manufacturers provide a really nice interior with lots of leather, wood and other high quality materials is the main point. All the gizmos tend to lose their wow effect quite quickly whereas a good interior lasts a cars lifetime. I really hope that Jaguar get this one right although I suspect that they can’t recapture the flair of the old Jaguar interiors. Call me old fashioned but that’s the way it is.

  3. tr man you are correct, my sd1 vanden plas still has in my opinion a beautiful interior design after 30 years wood and leather, it does actually have a trip computer believe it or not and the control panel looks good on the lower centre console with all the buttons lit up at night, but people always comment on the interior!! the computer is very low tech when you look at todays cars tho…

  4. how soon before all that tech is out of date or can it be updated?? that question goes for all new cars i suppose…

  5. But if you take the view that investment in technology is a waste because it will date then progress will grind to a halt. Like it or not for the people who will actually buy this car today a Radiomobile MW/LW push button radio just will not do!

  6. I agree that the XE needs a special, high-quality interior to stand the test of time. My S-Type for example, though dated, still thrills with its tactile qualities and the aroma of the high quality leather.

    I must admit that the dash design as shown appears to be a little generic and not very “Jaguar”, although I will reserve final judgement until it’s shown in full, of course.

    I have to say I can’t stand heads-up displays and other pointless gimmicks but it will stand Jaguar in good stead to have them.

  7. I must agree that in this image the dashboard moulding looks like something left behind by Ford. Completely at odds with all this high tech connectivity and the image Jaguar is trying to build for this car. Hopefully it will look rather better in the flesh.

  8. Hmmm, more bloody technology to get between the driver and the car. Some of us don’t want a smartphone- I have the cheapest plastic Nokia brick with the minimum of gizmos on it, and I am happy with it.

    Trouble is, anything smartphone related will have inbuilt obsolescence- in 10-15 years time will the owner have to scout around on ebay looking for a second-hand smartphone so that he can operate the air con because smartphones will have evolved to new operating systems not compatible with the car?

    As someone who delivers and collects fleet cars (and other vehicles) for a living, modern car technology can be baffling and very distracting. I wouldn’t mind so much if it was designed to be intuitive, but car manufacturers seek to outdo each other in ways to make the simplest things difficult. For example, how to switch of Traffic Announcements on some car stereos- some will have a TA button that you press twice, once to shut up Radio Local who have rudely interrupted an interesting Radio 4 discussion with some banale banter long before they actually get to the traffic bit; and once to turn it off altogether. Yet many stereos don’t have a TA button, or obvious way to switch it off, which can be extremely frustrating when you are on a motorway with nowhere to pull over and get the manual out.

    And trying to bring up the mileometer on certain cars- as we are required to do for recording purposes- its not even obvious on some cars which is the mileometer and what is the count-down until the next service, or trip computer.

    Adding smartphone compatibility is fine for music and in-car telephony purposes, but for goodness sake, if basic vehicle settings can be done on a smartphone, surely they could be built in to the vehicle’s electronics as settings for electric seat adjustments already are?

    Fine, so have the head up display, but keep the basics simple, intuitive, and not subject to the vagaries of smartphone fashion.

  9. good points they are putting more and more distractions into cars all the time. how can new cars ever become classics and be saved in say 40 years time you wont have the relevant technology to keep em going it will all be obselete.. i think cars as classics are well gone…

  10. What matters is selling the car NOW, not whether it will be a classic in 20 years time.

    “Call me old-fashioned..” OK then, You ARE old-fashioned!

    If you like driving a car that was made 20 years ago, then fine, that’s your liberty, but someone has to buy them now, so that they exist in 20 years time.

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